What is the universal truth about life according to Jim in All My Sons?

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When Chris Keller has run away from home, his mother, Kate, is concerned about whether he will ever come back. She asks Dr. Jim Bayliss what he thinks, and Jim replies with what he regards as a universal rule of life:

We all come back, Kate. These private little revolutions...

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When Chris Keller has run away from home, his mother, Kate, is concerned about whether he will ever come back. She asks Dr. Jim Bayliss what he thinks, and Jim replies with what he regards as a universal rule of life:

We all come back, Kate. These private little revolutions always die. The compromise is always made.

Jim, as usual, is thinking of his own situation. He recalls a time when he ran away to New Orleans and lived there "on bananas and milk" for two months, conducting the type of medical research that he had always wanted, and still wants, to do. Eventually, however, his wife found him, and her obvious distress persuaded him to return home. He now has a stable job as a physician, one which pays the bills but for which he has no real enthusiasm. He tells Kate that he now lives "in the usual darkness," complaining,

I can't find myself; it's hard sometimes to remember the kind of man I wanted to be.

Jim says that he is a good husband and that Chris is a good son. He does not regard either of these descriptions as an accolade, however, since being a good husband has made him abandon his principles and cease to follow what he describes as the "star" of his honesty. Chris, he says, will do the same as he did. He almost certainly did not go far and will return soon. Jim concludes mournfully,

He probably just wanted to be alone to watch his star go out.

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