What is the thesis or central message for Common Sense, by Paine?

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Common Sense is Thomas Paine's argument for the United States's becoming independent from the British Empire. He feels it is the most logical course of action for a variety of reasons.

Firstly, Paine is critical of monarchies in general. He feels kings are more interested in gaining and retaining...

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Common Sense is Thomas Paine's argument for the United States's becoming independent from the British Empire. He feels it is the most logical course of action for a variety of reasons.

Firstly, Paine is critical of monarchies in general. He feels kings are more interested in gaining and retaining power than in truly governing in ways that promote the interests of the common person. He also has no love for the aristocracy, citing similar criticisms of their conduct in regard to political influence.

Paine promotes the idea of a republic in his pamphlet. While critics of republics thought rule by the people was close to anarchy or even mob rule, Paine believes that people are better judges of what is good for them than kings or nobles more interested in their own power.

Paine also believes the American colonies were resourceful and self-sufficient enough to rule themselves. Great Britain was no longer needed as a host country. Paine even argues the American colonies could build a powerful navy to rival even Great Britain's, considering the greatness of their shipbuilding industries.

Ultimately, Paine's ideas found a ready audience. Common Sense was a best-seller, and its wide circulation among the American colonists inspired many to back the revolution.

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The main message behind Thomas Paine's Common Sense is that the American colonists should take drastic action to change their standing with the British government. In a similar vein as the Declaration of Independence, this pamphlet was an opportunity to garner support for the impending revolution.

Numerous colonists were still trying to make amends and repair the relationship with Britain, in spite of their own suffering. Being loyal subjects of the British Empire, they were discouraged from outright separation from their motherland. However, as Paine argues fervently, the injustices were far too great to be ignored or swept under the rug. Paine states in this pamphlet that there was a time for reparation, but England had continued far past what would be acceptable at that time.

The taxation and infringement of rights and personal freedoms were overbearing on the colonists, and it was time to do something about it, as stated Paine. He made arguments concerning the high levels of taxation and, more importantly, the lack of representation in Parliament—which was levying the taxes—to convince the American people that they should split from the British government. In the end, obviously, his intent was well-received, as he drummed up sufficient support and the United States were formed.

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Common Sense, initially called Plain Truth, argued that the American colonies should go beyond trying to settle their grievances with England and, instead, become an independent nation. That is its central message.

The colonists had not been thinking about independence as a real possibility before the publication of the pamphlet. People might have talked about it, but that was a far cry from actually pursuing this goal. After the pamphlet was circulated, people began to think: why not?

The radical Paine proposal was that the new nation should be a republic. A republic is ruled by people who were elected by a common vote. Paine rejected the whole idea of monarchy—even a constitutional monarchy—arguing that a monarch was simply a parasite of the state who involved his country in costly wars. He wrote: "Of more worth is one honest man to society and in the sight of God, than all the crowned ruffians that ever lived." A republic at the time was a very radical idea, akin in many people's minds to anarchy.

Paine advocated for independence not only because he thought being tied to a monarchy was a bad idea but also because so many settlers in America were not even English. The settlers, for example. were Dutch, German, French, and Swiss. He argued that a country with such a mix of European ethnicities should not be tied one particular country.

These arguments, put in simple language, helped galvanize the colonists to seek independence.

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There are really two central messages in Common Sense, but they both really lead to the same conclusion. That is that the American colonies should declare independence from Great Britain. Paine bases this conclusion on two premises. The first is that hereditary monarchy is inherently bad and corrupt. Paine argues that "exalting one man so greatly above the rest cannot be justified on the equal rights of nature." He remarks that undeserving people may be elevated to the monarchy by heredity, and that the "mixed" constitution of Great Britain is not the wellspring of people's rights. Rather, they were born with rights by virtue of being human. The British government, because it was fundamentally based on heredity, could not be trusted to protect the rights of men. The second message of Common Sense, and Paine's second argument for independence, is that the colonies were simply ready to separate from Great Britain. They were capable of economic self-sufficiency and would actually flourish once removed from the external restrictions placed on their trade when they became independent. Separation from Great Britain just made sense even apart from the ideological arguments he makes in the first part of the pamphlet. So for these two main reasons, Paine advocated independence from Great Britain.

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Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" was one of the major factors in bringing about the American Revolution.  The main thesis or central message of the book was A) that monarchy was a bad form of government and B) that the American colonies should become free from England and form their own country.

Before Paine wrote this pamphlet, the idea of rebelling against England was not very strong in the colonies.  Neither was the idea that monarchy should be abolished.  Instead, most people wanted to remain part of Britain, under the king, but with better laws and a bit more self-government.  Paine's writing convinced large numbers of Americans that it would be better to be independent and to no longer have a king.

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