What is the theme present in "Resolution and Independence"? Explain in detail.

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Wordsworth’s poem is kind of self-critique, or a criticism of poetic sensibility. The poem opens with the poet describing a beautiful morning on the moors; he is charmed by the scenery, until his mind is clouded with “fears and fancies”—a dim sense of foreboding of a future of “solitude, pain...

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Wordsworth’s poem is kind of self-critique, or a criticism of poetic sensibility. The poem opens with the poet describing a beautiful morning on the moors; he is charmed by the scenery, until his mind is clouded with “fears and fancies”—a dim sense of foreboding of a future of “solitude, pain of heart, distress, and poverty.”

It is here that the poem poses its vital question:

My whole life I have lived in pleasant thought,
As if life's business were a summer mood;
As if all needful things would come unsought
To genial faith, still rich in genial good;
But how can He expect that others should
Build for him, sow for him, and at his call
Love him, who for himself will take no heed at all?
Wordsworth sees his sense of foreboding as a part of a larger problem with the world, namely, God’s apparent unwillingness to “take heed” of what happens on Earth. His mention of the “marvelous Boy,” Thomas Chatterton, the gifted poet who committed suicide at 17, suggests that the poetic sensibility leads to “despondency and madness.”
Wordsworth’s encounter with the leech gatherer provides a kind of answer to this problem. The aged man represents a kind of natural nobility; his simple speech is a “lofty utterance,” a kind of poetry in itself. But what strikes Wordsworth is the comparison of his own situation to that of the leech gatherer; whereas Wordsworth, who has “always lived in pleasant thought,” is troubled by anxiety, the leech gatherer, who roams the moors in search of leeches, “Housing, with God’s good help, by choice or chance.” Wordsworth realizes that his encounter with the man is a kind of admonishment for his lack of faith. He sees the old man’s determination and steadfastness as an answer to his own crisis of faith: “I could have laughed myself to scorn to find In thatdecrepit Man so firm a mind.”
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The poem "Resolution and Independence" deals with the struggle of the narrator to "find" himself.  The narrator wonders whether or not he can become the person he needs to be, one that is more patient and resolute, like the leech-gatherer he encounters.  The narrator at first feels at one with nature, but that changes after the encounter with the leech-gatherer:

He realizes that his essential quality of mental or spiritual identity cannot rely upon an external environment for its continuing strength. At first, the speaker feels at one with the happy springtime setting, but when he falls suddenly into despair, he is puzzled into a crisis of confidence in himself. (eNotes)

He realizes that he cannot rely on nature and his connection with it to be happy.  He realizes he must reflect and contemplate in addition to connecting with nature.  

Finally, “ 'Resolution and Independence' celebrates the human capacity to make use of the natural and to learn from sympathetic responses to fellow human creatures" (eNotes).

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