What is the symbolic relation to the island being like the Garden of Eden?

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The island in Lord of the Flies is similar to the biblical Garden of Eden in several ways. First, it concerns relatively new beings and the choices these beings make, which will shape who they are. While Adam and Eve were literally new humans in that they were the first...

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The island in Lord of the Flies is similar to the biblical Garden of Eden in several ways. First, it concerns relatively new beings and the choices these beings make, which will shape who they are. While Adam and Eve were literally new humans in that they were the first to be created, the boys on the island also may as well be a new type of society in that they are forced into a situation in which they must shape their own destinies. This is in sharp contrast to the relatively structured life from which they no doubt came. Much like the Garden of Eden, the island on which the boys are stranded can be seen as an experiment.

Furthermore, the boys trapped on the island are submitted to a great temptation. However, it it is not the fruit of knowledge that the boys are tempted by. Instead, they are tempted by violence. The titular Lord of the Flies can indeed be seen as a parallel of the serpent, insisting that the very nature of the children is darkness and violence, in the same way that the serpent led Adam and Eve to believe that they could be improved with the knowledge of the fruit.

Jack, for instance, indulges deeply in the forbidden violence. He becomes so enraptured by his new savage authority that he forgets all hope of being rescued and the light of civilization, much in the same way that Adam and Eve forget the light of God in the wake of their new sight. In the greatest parallel to the biblical tale, at the end of the story, the boys are discovered by a naval officer, in the same way that Adam and Eve are discovered by God. Immediately, all of their newfound and bloodthirsty passion seems regrettable, trivial, and tragically embarrassing.

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Golding employs many religious allusions throughout his classic novel Lord of the Flies, which includes the uninhabited tropical island symbolically representing the Garden of Eden. Similar to the Garden of Eden, the uninhabited tropical paradise is a benevolent, giving island, where the boys do not have to work for food and can simply eat the fruit found in the surrounding forest. The island is also uninhabited and untainted by humans before the boys arrive. Similar to Adam and Eve, the boys are the first humans on the island and there is no prior civilization present on the island to influence their actions.

There is also the appearance of a "snake-thing," which the boys eventually interpret as a malevolent beast on the island. At the beginning of the novel, the boy with the mulberry-colored birthmark claims to have seen a "snake-thing." The "snake-thing" alludes to the serpent, which tempted Adam and Eve to eat from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. The consequences following Adam and Eve's sin led to the fall of man, which Golding alludes to by illustrating the boys' gradual descent into savagery. Similar to the Garden of Eden, the once beautiful paradise is transformed into a threatening, unfriendly environment, where the boys cannot peacefully enjoy themselves.

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The island is like the Garden of Eden because it's just a beautiful place. And not only is it beautiful, it's also a place where the boys have total freedom for the first time in their lives. Back in England, the boys were under the control of their parents and teachers. They had to follow rules, do as they were told.

But here on the island it couldn't be more different. Free from adult supervision, the boys feel liberated, that they can do as they please. Whether they're skinny dipping, building fires, or hunting pigs, the boys are truly in hog heaven. No wonder they think it's paradise.

But like Adam and Eve, the boys aren't destined to stay in paradise forever. They'll remain on the island, but the island itself will soon turn into a hell on earth, racked with bloodshed, violence, and a no-holds-barred struggle for absolute power. As in the story of Adam and Eve, evil will enter into this paradise and corrupt the souls of those already mired in original sin.

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In the garden of Eden, Adam and Eve had freedom to choose from all the fruit trees except one. They were innocent and did not realize they were naked. In much the same way, Ralph and the boys have freedom to eat of all the fruit trees. They swim around innocently while they are naked. 

The forbidden fruit would be the meat because Jack and his hunters have to kill an innocent animal to get it. This causes blood shed which hurts the heart of God. 

The boys were in a paradise setting yet they were not satisfied. They lusted for forbidden meat. They became consumed with the idea of bloodshed. Killing became a game. It became too easy. 

Likewise, when Adam and Eve lusted for the forbidden fruit, they ate of the fruit and discovered they were naked. They lost their innocence just like Jack and his hunters did. The first animal had to die to clothe Adam and Eve. This broke the heart of God in that Adam and Eve lost their innocence while an animal lost its life to clothe them.

Next, Adam's and Eve's children are murdering one another. 

Simon does represent the Jesus Christ figure. He is a picture of goodness. He had to be sacrificed just like Jesus Christ in order to save Ralph from becoming bloodthirsty like Jack:

Perhaps the most symbolic character in the story, Simon represents the religious prophet or seer who is sensitive and inarticulate yet who, of all the boys, perhaps sees reality most clearly.

Simon is the most spiritual. He has insight and wisdom beyond his years.

From the time Jack and his hunters killed their first pig, their innocence was over. They became obsessed with the kill. Killing became an evil adventure. These innocent children became lustful and even obscene as to how Roger put his spear into the anus of the sow and twisted it to hear the screaming anguish of the sow. Roger and the boys just laughed. 

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