What is the role of the question in the introduction to Being and Time? What makes questioning, understood in the Heideggerian sense, the privileged mode of analysis when it comes to Being and beings, as well as Dasein?

In the introduction to Being and Time, Heidegger poses the question of Being as the most fundamental question in philosophy. He argues that philosophers should concern themselves with asking questions rather than suggesting answers. He believes that the question of what it means to exist has been forgotten since the time of the ancient Greek philosophers and that modern philosophers must now ask it anew.

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The question of Being lies at the very heart of Heidegger's Being and Time . To Heidegger, it is the most important, most fundamental question to ask in philosophy. And according to Heidegger, philosophy as he defines it should be concerned with asking questions—not, as is often supposed, in providing...

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The question of Being lies at the very heart of Heidegger's Being and Time. To Heidegger, it is the most important, most fundamental question to ask in philosophy. And according to Heidegger, philosophy as he defines it should be concerned with asking questions—not, as is often supposed, in providing answers.

As Heidegger makes clear in the Introduction to Being and Time,the reason the question of Being needs to be posed is because it has been forgotten. For thousands of years, ever since the ancient Greeks, philosophers have ignored the question of Being, preferring instead to concern themselves with beings, with things. In philosophical jargon, Western philosophy has been focused on ontic questions—those relating to things or entities—rather than the fundamental ontological question: the question of Being.

This whole period of philosophy is described by Heidegger as metaphysical, and Heidegger, in posing the question of Being once more, wants to depart from metaphysics and in doing so effectively put an end to philosophy as traditionally conceived.

To be sure, Heidegger acknowledges that the practice of metaphysics has, over thousands of years, asked many very important questions, such as "Does God exist?" or "Does my mind exist?" or "How can I be sure that other minds exist?" But all of these questions are based on the assumption that we already know what it means to exist. All of them raise the fundamental question: what does to exist actually mean?

It follows from this that until and unless we pose the question of Being anew, we will never be in a position to ask other important philosophical questions, let alone attempt to answer them in any meaningful way (if indeed it is possible to answer them). So, in posing this question, Heidegger is concerning himself, unlike his philosophical predecessors, with what it is that makes beings, including human beings, intelligible as beings.

In other words, we can never really know what we are until we have some grasp of the fundamental question of Being and all that it entails. In particular, we must address the issue of Dasein, which is the experience of Being as it is experienced by human beings in the world.

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