illustration of a dead bird lying within a black box

A Jury of Her Peers

by Susan Glaspell
Start Free Trial

What is the rising action of "A Jury of Her Peers"?

The rising action of "A Jury of Her Peers" concerns the search for evidence in the Wright farmhouse.

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

The rising action is where the central conflict of the story gains in momentum and tension. It precedes the climax, where the conflict comes to a head.

In "A Jury of Her Peers ," the rising action consists of the search for evidence in the Wright farmhouse. While...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

The rising action is where the central conflict of the story gains in momentum and tension. It precedes the climax, where the conflict comes to a head.

In "A Jury of Her Peers," the rising action consists of the search for evidence in the Wright farmhouse. While the men conduct what they think is a thorough search, the women (both of them farmwives who knew Minnie Wright) go through Minnie's domestic things, trying to find out if and why she killed her husband. Looking at the elements of women's daily life that the men see as unimportant, such as sewing work and canned fruit, they discover that Minnie was neglected by her coldhearted husband, who could not even bother to give her the money to buy new clothes. The tension builds as the women reconstruct Minnie's miserable situation from the details in her home, and the men subsequently say the women are wasting time on trifling matters.

The rising action ends when the women realize why Minnie killed her husband. Minnie had a songbird as a companion, and her husband deliberately broke its neck. As a result, Minnie strangled her husband to death with a knotted rope in his sleep.

Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on