What is the rhyme scheme of "Hymn to Proserpine" by Algernon Charles Swinburne?

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The rhyme scheme of Algernon Swinburne's "Hymn to Proserpine " is aabbccdd. In other words, the poem is written in rhyming couplets. Rhyming couplets were very common and even the default poetic form in the eighteenth century, and they but fell out of favor with the advent of Romanticism....

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The rhyme scheme of Algernon Swinburne's "Hymn to Proserpine" is aabbccdd. In other words, the poem is written in rhyming couplets. Rhyming couplets were very common and even the default poetic form in the eighteenth century, and they but fell out of favor with the advent of Romanticism. Swinburne was one of several Victorian poets who brought them back into common use.

It is immediately apparent, however, that "Hymn to Proserpine" is not an eighteenth-century poem. Swinburne was one of the greatest exponents of traditional literary forms at the time and one of the most radical poetic innovators of the nineteenth century. While Alexander Pope and his imitators cast their rhyming couplets in strict iambic pentameter, Swinburne combines an element of free verse with his couplets as he writes in long, flowing lines, generally at least fourteen syllables in length but sometimes fifteen, sixteen, seventeen or more. These lines follow a variety of metrical patterns, which imitate the rhythms of speech and make the end-rhymes less noticeable.

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