What is the relationship between the Friar and Romeo characterized by in Romeo and Juliet?

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Romeo's relationship with Friar Laurence is a direct parallel to Juliet 's relationship with her nurse. In both cases, there is clearly a distance between child and parents; in both cases, the child has sought out a familial relationship with someone to whom they are not actually related. This...

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Romeo's relationship with Friar Laurence is a direct parallel to Juliet's relationship with her nurse. In both cases, there is clearly a distance between child and parents; in both cases, the child has sought out a familial relationship with someone to whom they are not actually related. This is underscored in Romeo's first line to Friar Laurence in the play, in which he calls him "father." Of course, "father" is a term that is a common form of address for members of the clergy but not usually for friars. Romeo's use of it here indicates to the audience that his relationship with the Friar is something of a father-son scenario. Friar Laurence, too, calls Romeo "son," and the way he addresses him suggests that he knows him well: he wonders why Romeo is awake so early, being aware of his habits, and rightly judges that Romeo "hath not been in bed to-night." It is also clear that Friar Laurence is a confidant for Romeo: he knows about Romeo's history with Rosaline, and Romeo confesses to Friar Laurence that he is now "set" on Juliet and wishes to be married to her.

The Friar offers Romeo counsel, being slightly alarmed by this sudden "change." He has chided Romeo in the past for "doting" upon Rosaline and is now not entirely convinced that the young man can have had such a change in feeling so quickly. He advises Romeo, "they stumble that run fast." However, more important to him than the desire to hold Romeo back from poor decisions is his desire to see Romeo happy. Ultimately, his love for Romeo overrides his caution, and he agrees to let Romeo have his way and marry Juliet.
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Romeo and Friar Laurence have a father-son relationship, much like the Nurse and Juliet have a mother-daughter relationship. Like with Juliet, this suggests much about Romeo's relationship with his own parents since he needs to go to a non-relative for advice and guidance. With Laurence, Romeo does not need to worry about appearing macho as he does with his friends, nor does he need to hide anything about how he feels.

Laurence is fond of Romeo, but he is quite aware of the boy's flaws, namely his being in love with love and his impulsiveness. When Romeo comes to him to ask Laurence to marry himself and Juliet, the friar is rightfully taken aback, since only a few days ago, Romeo was pining after Rosaline. However, he agrees to marry the two because he believes a union between the Capulet and Montague houses might eventually lead to peace in Verona.

Unfortunately, Laurence is not very commanding, nor does he demand obedience from Romeo. To be fair, aggressive demands might have pushed Romeo away. However, as the other answer points out, Romeo loves Friar Laurence but only respects him to a certain point. Romeo's class makes him view the friar as more of a glorified servant than as someone to be listened to in regards to advice about loving moderately and being patient. This also comes with Romeo's youth. How many teens listen to the adults in their life 100% of the time, even today?

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Friar Laurence functions as a father figure to Romeo. Romeo does not feel he can confide in his own father, since Romeo is in love with and wants to marry a young woman from the hated Capulet house. Therefore, he turns to the friar.

The friar enables the marriage between the two young lovers and tries his best to help and protect them. He doesn't quite believe the two are in love (after all they barely know each other) but he hopes the relationship will lead to mending the quarrel between the two houses. He also doles out fatherly advice to Romeo. He tries to tell him to moderate his passion for Juliet, for example, or it might too quickly burn out. The friar warns:

These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which as they kiss consume. The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
And in the taste confounds the appetite.
Therefore love moderately.

The friar, however, lacks the authority of a parent and seems to be seen by Romeo more as a person that can do his bidding than someone whose advice he ought to take too seriously, much as likes and relies on the friar. If Romeo had actually paid attention to the friar and chosen to "love moderately," he might not have been so quick to kill himself.

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The relationship between the characters of  Friar Lawrence and Romeo is complicated. The Friar acts as a guiding figure to Romeo throughout the play. Romeo goes to the Friar in search of advice and guidance. When he meets Juliet, he seeks the Friar's help. Friar Lawrence begins by scolding him for allowing his heart to be moved so quickly from Rosaline to his new love stating that "Young men's love then lies not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes." However, like a loving father figure he contrives a way to marry the two and bring a peace to the two warring families. 

After things go wrong and Romeo kills Tybalt, it is the Friar that hides Romeo and devises the plan to get him out of Verona and reunite him with Juliet.

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