What is the relationship between Miranda and Caliban in The Tempest?

The relationship between Miranda and Caliban is hostile, since Caliban attempted to rape her.

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Miranda and Caliban's relationship is a negative one, to say the least. Caliban is resentful of the presence of Prospero and Miranda on the island, especially of Prospero's imposed sovereignty over the land and him. As an attempt to reclaim the island, Caliban tried to rape and impregnate the young...

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Miranda and Caliban's relationship is a negative one, to say the least. Caliban is resentful of the presence of Prospero and Miranda on the island, especially of Prospero's imposed sovereignty over the land and him. As an attempt to reclaim the island, Caliban tried to rape and impregnate the young Miranda, wanting to "people" the island with "Calibans." He is unapologetic about the rape attempt and treats it lightly when it is brought up to him by Prospero.

For her part, Miranda dislikes Caliban just as much, if not more, than he does her because of the attack. When Caliban acknowledges his intention to impregnate her during the attack, she lashes out in a manner contrary to her usual gentle nature:

Abhorred slave,
Which any print of goodness wilt not take,
Being capable of all ill! I pitied thee,
Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour
One thing or other: when thou didst not, savage,
Know thine own meaning, but wouldst gabble like
A thing most brutish, I endow'd thy purposes
With words that made them known. But thy vile race,
Though thou didst learn, had that in't which
good natures
Could not abide to be with; therefore wast thou
Deservedly confined into this rock,
Who hadst deserved more than a prison.

(Interestingly, some editions of The Tempest change the speaker of these lines to Prospero. Perhaps some feel this vehemence is out of character for Miranda.)

Miranda views herself as a benevolent teacher looking to better Caliban by teaching him language and letters. His attack, beyond its repulsive nature, is also a rebuff regarding her efforts to act as a teacher.

Ultimately, there is no love lost between these two characters, and their relationship is never mended (not that it was ever close to begin with).

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