What is the purpose of Vanka’s writing?

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Vanka is lonely, homeless, and desperate. He writes his grandfather what amounts to a begging letter, desperately urging him to rescue him from his unhappy apprenticeship in Moscow by finding a place for him back at the country estate where he'd once spent such blissfully happy times.

As Vanka tells...

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Vanka is lonely, homeless, and desperate. He writes his grandfather what amounts to a begging letter, desperately urging him to rescue him from his unhappy apprenticeship in Moscow by finding a place for him back at the country estate where he'd once spent such blissfully happy times.

As Vanka tells it, life on the estate was almost idyllic. He could roam around freely with the other children out in the fresh air and among the wide open spaces. Contrast that with life in the big city, with its strange customs that make no sense—not to mention the physical abuse he receives from his master on an almost daily basis.

Little wonder, then, that Vanka is so desperate to return to his former life. And little wonder, too, that's he prepared to make his grandfather all kinds of elaborate promises as to what he will do for him if he can somehow arrange it for him to come back.

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