What is the point of view in "Sonny's Blues" by James Baldwin?

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Baldwin's story is told in the first person, by Sonny's brother. Because of the point of view, the information we have about Sonny and his family is limited by what the narrator tells us. For example, Sonny's drug use is a mystery to the narrator, and his struggle to piece together how Sonny became addicted mirrors our own struggle, as readers, to piece together Sonny's character. Even when the narrator and Sonny are together, the narrator is focused on the hidden nature of Sonny's internal life; this finds expression in many small ways (for instance, the narrator is afraid Sonny will think he is "humoring him" by telling the taxi driver to drive along the park), but mostly it takes the form of a form of investigation into why Sonny is...

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anumprinces | Student

How does the narrator's experiences and values, his world view, affect the of view in sonny's blues? Does this perception contribute to the conflict between the brothers? What factor contribute to the brothers' reconciliation and the narrator's epiphany?