What is the point of view in "Sonny's Blues" by James Baldwin?

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Baldwin's story is told in the first person, by Sonny's brother. Because of the point of view, the information we have about Sonny and his family is limited by what the narrator tells us. For example, Sonny's drug use is a mystery to the narrator, and his struggle to piece together how Sonny became addicted mirrors our own struggle, as readers, to piece together Sonny's character. Even when the narrator and Sonny are together, the narrator is focused on the hidden nature of Sonny's internal life; this finds expression in many small ways (for instance, the narrator is afraid Sonny will think he is "humoring him" by telling the taxi driver to drive along the park), but mostly it takes the form of a form of investigation into why Sonny is the way he his, and, by extension, what separates the school teacher narrator from his brother.

The first person narration includes other points of view in the form of reported speech; one good example of this is the narrator's mother's story about...

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