Everything That Rises Must Converge

by Flannery O’Connor
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what is the point of view in "Everything That Rises Must Converge"?

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"Everything That Rises Must Converge" is written in a Third Person Limited point of view.

Generally speaking, there are three points of view: First Person, Second Person and Third Person (though Second Person is extremely rare). In First Person point of view, the story is told from the...

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"Everything That Rises Must Converge" is written in a Third Person Limited point of view.

Generally speaking, there are three points of view: First Person, Second Person and Third Person (though Second Person is extremely rare). In First Person point of view, the story is told from the perspective of one of its characters, and is reliant on the pronoun "I." Third Person point of view, on the other hand, is narrated from a perspective external to the story, and is reliant on pronouns such as "he," "she," or "they."

"Everything That Rises Must Converge" is written from Third Person perspective. Note that in this story, the narrator is not identifiable as any one particular character within it, as you see with First Person perspective. Contrast this short story with short stories or novels that actually are written in First Person point of view. For examples of first-person writing, consider "The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allen Poe or Moby Dick by Herman Melville to observe the distinction.

However, that being said, consider how the narration remains focused on the character of Julian, following his own perspective and viewpoint of events. We don't see the internal psychology of his mother or other people on the bus. This points towards the difference between Third Person Omniscient and Third Person Limited. In Third Person Omniscient, the narrator takes a wider vantage point. With a wider perspective, they can comment on the perspectives and emotions of every character within the story. In Third Person Limited, the narrator's knowledge is bound to a single character within it, much as First Person narration is. This story is an example of Third Person Limited point of view.

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