What is the plot of The Prince and the Pauper?

The plot of The Prince and the Pauper revolves around two boys with identical appearances who change roles in life. Tom is a pauper with an abusive alcoholic father. Edward is the son of the King of England. After exchanging clothes, Edward is mistakenly expelled from his palace and faces the ills of poverty. Tom must deal with the duties of a prince. In the end, their identities are revealed and all is rectified.

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Mark Twain’s The Prince and the Pauper is the tale of two innocent young boys trapped in their individual worlds. Each boy dreams about what it would be like to live the lifestyle of the other. The author uses their adventures to satirize social injustices.

As the story unfolds, two boys are born on the same day in London. Tom Canty is born into poverty and Edward Tudor is born into royalty as the Prince of Wales:

In the ancient city of London, on a certain autumn day in the second quarter of the sixteenth century, a boy was born to a poor family of the name of Canty, who did not want him. On the same day another English child was born to a rich family of the name of Tudor, who did want him.

Tom grows up in “a foul little pocket called Offal Court, out of Pudding Lane.” His father is an abusive alcoholic living in a wretched house that is “small, decayed, and rickety.” One day, when Tom is fifteen years old, he wanders through the city of London where he happens upon Edward Tudor standing by a fence near his palace. As soldiers move to turn Tom away, Edward intervenes and invites Tom into the royal quarters:

Edward took Tom to a rich apartment in the palace, which he called his cabinet. By his command a repast was brought such as Tom had never encountered before except in books. The prince, with princely delicacy and breeding, sent away the servants, so that his humble guest might not be embarrassed by their critical presence; then he sat near by, and asked questions while Tom ate.

As the boys talk, both realize how they feel trapped in their lifestyles. The Prince is always confined to his royal chambers, and Tom feels imprisoned by his father in his poverty-stricken world with no hope of escape. They exchange clothes to experience what it would be like to change roles in life. They look in a mirror and discover they have “the same hair, the same eyes, the same voice and manner, the same form and stature, the same face . . .” Realizing their likenesses, the Prince decides to punish the soldier that had mistreated Tom before his invitation to the palace. As the Prince leaves the room, the soldier casts him from the palace since he thinks the Prince is nothing but a poor beggar.

Outside of the palace, the Prince is forced to travel with thieves and vagabonds, beg for food, and witness the abuses inflicted upon the common people, all while proclaiming to no avail that he is the Prince of Wales. At the same time, Tom is looked upon as being mad since he has no idea about royal protocol and princely obligations. When the king dies, Tom is prepped for his coronation as the new King of England.

As the people of London gather for the coronation, Edward is able to interrupt the ceremony and claim his title. Since he alone knows the location of the “Great Seal of England,” his identity is finally established and he is crowned. Tom is honored as the “King’s Ward.” All the loose ends are tied and Edward becomes a merciful king because of his experiences living among the poor.

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The exposition of the story introduces readers to both Tom and Edward. Tom is a pauper and Edward is the Prince of Wales. After that comes a series of rising actions, but the first of those occurs when Tom and Edward realize that they look exactly alike. This then leads to them switching places, but it ends up becoming quite the problem as Tom begins governing quite differently, and Edward struggles with various nefarious characters and an overall inability to get back into the palace.

The climax occurs after the real king dies and Tom is about to be crowned the new king. Edward is finally able to get back and convince everybody that he is the real prince. The falling action sees Tom getting some special treatment that results in being freed from his abusive father, and the book concludes by letting readers know that Edward's short time on the throne was a time full of peace and justice.

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In this novel, Prince Edward, the son of Henry VIII, meets a poor commoner named Tom Canty who looks exactly like him and shares his birthday. Edward prevails upon Tom to change clothes with him, as he is curious about what it is like to be an ordinary person. Unfortunately, after this happens, the palace guards mistake the real prince for the pauper Tom, because of his ragged clothes, and cast him out of the castle.

Having been pampered and sheltered all his life, Edward is suddenly thrown into the real world where he has to fend for himself and live by his wits. He learns valuable lessons about how hard life is for poorer people. Tom, meanwhile, must learn to cope with being considered crazy because he doesn't know anything about how to act as a prince.

When Edward is finally able to get back to court after Henry VIII dies and Tom is about to be crowned, he convinces people he is the true prince by showing them where to find the great seal.

Edward's reign is then influenced by his experience among the common people. Since a mere change of clothing suddenly stripped him of his royal status, he realizes that the only difference between him and the average person is the accident of birth. He now understands that the common person needs to be treated more justly and compassionately.

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The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain is a story about two boys who live different lives. The story is set in London in the sixteenth century. The two boys are Edward and Tom. The former is a prince while the latter is a beggar. When they meet, they notice that they look alike and agree to exchange their clothes so that each can live the other person’s life for a moment. The experiences that they have change their lives completely. Edward lives as a poor person and goes through many challenges as a lower class member of the society. Conversely, Tom lives a glamorous life but has the constant fear of his identity being discovered by the royal family.

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Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper tells the story of two identical young boys: a pauper named Tom Canty and the son of King Henry VIII, Prince Edward. The two boys meet when Tom is caught by guards while exploring the castle grounds and Edward stops them from punishing him. The two boys spend time talking and learning about each others' lives and discover that not only do they look physically identical, but they were also born on the same day. They decide to switch places: Edward leaves the palace in rags and faces the violent abuse of Tom's father, while Tom pretends to be the prince. During their time acting as each other, Edward learns about the cruelty of the judicial system, and Tom causes the palace staff to fear the prince is losing his memory. On the day of Tom's coronation as King Edward VI, Edward reappears at the palace and shows the Great Seal he had stolen to prove his identity. The two switch back to their original lives, with Edward becoming King and naming Tom his ward.

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