What is the plot of Pygmalion?

The plot of Pygmalion revolves around Professor Henry Higgins's transformation of flower seller Eliza Doolittle into an upper-class lady, exploring the relationship between the two.

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George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion begins one summer night in Covenant Garden, and we are quickly introduced to the main characters: Eliza Doolittle (a flower seller), Professor Henry Higgins (a scholar and teacher of language), and Colonel Pickering (a man interested in Higgins's work). Higgins, we soon learn, teaches...

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George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion begins one summer night in Covenant Garden, and we are quickly introduced to the main characters: Eliza Doolittle (a flower seller), Professor Henry Higgins (a scholar and teacher of language), and Colonel Pickering (a man interested in Higgins's work). Higgins, we soon learn, teaches upper-class English to people of low social origins.

The play's conflict appears when Eliza shows up on Higgins's doorstep requesting to learn proper English. Higgins has already bragged that he could make people think that Eliza is a duchess with only three months of English lessons, and Pickering makes a bet with him that he cannot. If Higgins can, Pickering will cover the costs.

Eliza's transformation thus begins, and the play's action rises. Soon Eliza's father, Alfred Doolittle, arrives. Higgins pays him to leave, and he does, after failing to recognize his daughter's new look. Higgins gets his mother involved and brings Eliza to a gathering at Mrs. Higgins's house. Eliza looks the part, but she has no idea how to act, telling a long story about her family. Mrs. Higgins tells her son that his experiment will never succeed; Eliza simply cannot be transformed into an upper-class lady.

As the play continues, Eliza improves dramatically, to the point that Nepommuck thinks that she must be some foreign princess. Higgins appears to have won his bet, and he is quickly getting bored. Eliza, however, becomes angry at Higgins's disdain for her and at her uncertain future. The two quarrel as the action rises further.

Alfred Doolittle reappears, claiming that he has received a huge inheritance. He looks the part, but he doesn't like being rich. He prefers being poor and free. Eliza and Higgins argue again, and Higgins instructs Eliza to run some errands for him. The play reaches its climax in this argument, and Eliza hints that she will marry Freddy, who is in love with her. Higgins cannot help but admire Eliza, though he believes all his work transforming her would be wasted on Freddy. Aware of her equal standing with Higgins, Eliza resolves to leave for good, though Higgins doubts she will be gone for long. In the "sequel" of the play, Shaw reveals that Eliza does marry Freddy.

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