What is the play The Busie Body by Susanna Centlivre about?

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The Busie Body concludes with these words from Sir Jealous Traffick, which encapsulate the central theme of the play:

By my Example let all Parents move,And never strive to cross their Children's Love;But still submit that Care to Providence above.

Sir Jealous has been trying to compel his...

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The Busie Body concludes with these words from Sir Jealous Traffick, which encapsulate the central theme of the play:

By my Example let all Parents move,
And never strive to cross their Children's Love;
But still submit that Care to Providence above.

Sir Jealous has been trying to compel his daughter, Isabinda, to marry Seignior Diego Babinetto, the husband he has selected for her. The man she really loves, Charles Gripe, disguises himself as Babinetto, and the marriage goes ahead, with Sir Jealous's oblivious paternal consent.

Meanwhile, Charles's father, Sir Francis Gripe, has been scheming to marry his young ward, Miranda. She manages to trick him into thinking she is willing to go through with the wedding so that he will give her an open permission to marry, which she then uses to marry the man she loves, Sir George Airey.

Even from this very brief summary, it is clear that the principal themes of The Busie Body are marriage and, as Sir Jealous's final lines express, the interference of parents and guardians, or perhaps the older generation in general, in the love affairs of the young. The play shows the manipulative conduct on the part of the old consistently coming to grief, generally because the young are quicker witted and more expert in dissimulation. Interference of all kinds, including that of Marplot, the well-intentioned but inept busybody of the title, is shown to be powerless to divert the course of true love.

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In the opening scenes of The Busie Body, which was written in 1709 by Susanna Centlivre, we meet Isabinda and Miranda, two young women who are desperate to escape situations that will prevent them from marrying the young men they have chosen. Almost the entire plot of the play is concerned with how the young ladies must fight to change their fate and break free from others' expectations for them.

Miranda is being hounded by her aged legal guardian who wants to marry her, while Isabinda has already been promised by her father to a Spanish gentleman who intends to marry her and then lock her inside his home so she can never leave. Although the subject matter sounds rather dire, this is a comedy, after all, and there are many silly plot twists and comic misunderstandings. Playing the "clown" role of the Busie Body himself is a character named Marplot, who keeps cluelessly stumbling into scenes throughout the play.

Ultimately, both Miranda and Isabinda wind up marrying the men of their choosing, and all's well that ends well.

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The widely successful romantic play The Busie Body is essentially a sort of classical rom-com that follows lovers as they flirt, scheme, and betray.

Miranda lives with the much older Frances Gripe, who plans to marry Miranda for her looks, her youth, and her money. To complicate things, of course, Miranda is deeply in love with the handsome George Airy. Scheming and intelligent, Miranda plans to pretend to love Frances Gripe in order to get the necessary legal paperwork that would allow her to get her rightfully owned money as well as her independence. Meanwhile, Marplot, a nosy character and the titular busybody of the play, dabbles in these folks' lives, and ultimately messes up their intentions.

What the play is about, essentially, is women's roles—particularly in regards to society and marriage—in eighteenth-Century England. The lead women are strong, level-headed, and frequently do what they need to get what they want.

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The Busie Body, written in 1709 by Susanna Centlivre, an English poet, actress, and playwright, is a comedic play performed in five acts. The Busie Body originally ran for thirteen nights, which was a huge success for the time, and was then performed again the following year. The play is considered to be both clever and comedic in its interpretation of love and marriage.

As it goes, Miranda, one of the lead characters, pretends to be in love with Sir Francis, who really does love Miranda, but is secretly in love with Sir George, who is also in love with Miranda.

Isabinda, another important lead, is in love with Charles, who loves Isabinda in return, but is promised to a wealthy Spanish merchant.

Marplot, the comedic character, is a good friend to Miranda and Isabinda. He attempts to assist them, but is often the reason for their unsuccessful plots, hence the name "Marplot"--he mars their plots.

The play essentially follows Miranda as she attempts to end up with Sir George and Isabinda as she attempts to end up with Charles, all while Marplot foils their plans and makes a mess of everything.

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Susanna_Centlivre’s 1709 play, The Busie Body, is essentially a romantic comedy. There are two pairs of lovers. The first pair is Sir George Airy and Miranda. Sir Francis Gripe, Miranda’s guardian, objects to Sir George because he himself wants to  marry Miranda for her fortune. Sir Jealous Traffick is a rich English  merchant who lived in Spain for many years but now has returned to England; he follows the Spanish custom of allowing his daughter, Isabinda,  little freedom. Charles Gripe, poor but virtuous, wants to marry Isabinda but Sir Jealous wants her to marry a rich Spanish merchant. Marplot (the `busie body`) and Miranda scheme to arrange the marriages despite the objections of father an guardian, and succeed.

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