What is the page number on which Atticus describes courage in To Kill a Mockingbird? I can't find it. I read the whole book and forgot to look for that, and now, going back, I don't see it anywhere.

The page number on which Atticus describes courage in To Kill a Mockingbird is on page 128 in the 50th Anniversary First Perennial Classic edition of To Kill a Mockingbird. This passage occurs in the second to last paragraph of chapter 11.

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With different editions of the book in print, pages numbers can vary, but the important point is that Atticus's quote on courage occurs at the end of chapter 11, in the second to last paragraph. Here, Atticus tells Scout and Jem what true courage is:

It's when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what.

This definition of courage applies as much to Atticus as Mrs. Dubose, the woman Atticus is talking about. Atticus will show true courage by seeing the Tom Robinson trial through with honor and integrity even though he knows from the start there is no way Robinson can be found innocent of rape in the racist south.

In the context that Atticus is discussing, the difficult Mrs. Dubose, who angers the children by insulting both them and their father, has died just after kicking a morphine addiction. As a punishment for knocking the heads off her camellias, Atticus had insisted that Jem go every day and read to Mrs. Dubose. Unbeknownst to them, this has helped Mrs. Dubose stay away from morphine.

Another context is Atticus's recent shooting of Tim Johnson, a rabid dog threatening the neighborhood. Jem is impressed at Atticus's courage and his marksmanship in taking on the animal. Atticus wants Jem to understand that true courage doesn't come from shooting a gun but through living with integrity.

Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on February 23, 2021
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Since there are several editions of To Kill a Mockingbird, the specific page number on which Atticus describes courage will be different depending on what version you are reading. In the 50th Anniversary First Perennial Classic edition of the story, Atticus teaches his children the definition of "real courage" on page 128. Atticus defines "real courage" shortly after Mrs. Dubose passes away, which takes place toward the end of chapter twelve.

Atticus explains to his children that Mrs. Dubose suffered from a chronic illness and was addicted to morphine to ease her pain. Instead of continuing to take the morphine and dying a painless death, Mrs. Dubose was determined to break her addiction and leave this world "beholden to nothing and nobody."

Breaking a morphine addiction as a chronically ill old woman was no easy task and required courage, perseverance, and self-control. Atticus goes on to explain how Jem's reading helped take her mind off the pain until she managed to conquer her addiction. According to Atticus, Mrs. Dubose was the bravest person he's ever met, and he uses her as an example to teach his children a lesson on courage by saying,

I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do. (128)

Atticus also demonstrates "real courage" by valiantly defending his Black client, Tom Robinson, in front of a racist jury and audience. Similar to Mrs. Dubose, Atticus knows that he cannot win but shows courage by taking the challenge and refusing to back down.

Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on February 23, 2021
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Atticus is talking to Jem and Scout about Mrs. Dubose.  Mrs. Dubose would always sit on her porch and comment as the children passed her house.  One day she said,

"Your father's no better than the niggers and trash he works for" (pg 102)

Jem gets so upset with this that he takes Scout's baton and cuts all the tops off of Mrs. Dubose's camelia bushes.  For this he was punished, He cleaned up the front yard and promised to work every Saturday on her yard to try to grow the camelias back to their original condition, and he had to read each day to Mrs. Dubose every afternoon and Saturdays for two hours.  Later the reader finds out that Mrs. Dubose was a morphine addict. 

"She took it as a pain killer for years.  The doctor put her on it.  She'd have spent the rest of her life on it and died without so much agony, but she was too contrary" (pg 111)

She wants to die free of the morphine addiction, and she succeeds.  When she does die, she sends Jem a camelia in a box.  At that time, Atticus explains,

"I wanted you to see what real courage is.  Instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand.  It's when you know you're licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do.  Mrs. Dubose won, all ninety-eight pounds of her.  According to her views, she died beholden to nothing and nobody. She was the bravest person I know. " (pg 112)

These quotes are from my version of the book.  They should be relatively close to these pages.  They are all in chapter 11.

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