What is the moral lesson conveyed in The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery?

The moral lesson conveyed in The Little Prince is that love of others is centrally important in life.

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The moral lesson of the book is that love is all important.

The Little Prince sadly leaves his asteroid when the rose he loves becomes too difficult for him to deal with. He fears she is not quite honest with him. She tells him, however, that she loves him.

Although...

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The moral lesson of the book is that love is all important.

The Little Prince sadly leaves his asteroid when the rose he loves becomes too difficult for him to deal with. He fears she is not quite honest with him. She tells him, however, that she loves him.

Although the Little Prince has adventures exploring the galaxy, he is still thinking about his rose when he meets the pilot. He tells the pilot that loving the rose makes him happy and that worrying about the rose being eaten by the sheep makes him sad. He is upset that the pilot doesn't seem to take this love and grief seriously.

Later, the Little Prince sees a garden full of roses just like his rose. He is deeply saddened that his rose, which he thought was precious because it was unique in the universe, is only one of millions of roses just like it. She is common. He begins to cry, but then, from the fox, he discovers that what creates love is not the uniqueness of the beloved but the relationship that bonds the lovers. What matters is taking time to get to know, care for, be "tamed" by, and become invested in one particular being beyond all others.

When the Little Prince learns this, he is willing to risk death to get back to his rose because he realizes that love, though invisible, is the most important thing in the universe.

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One of the many moral lessons we can derive from The Little Prince is the importance of retaining a child-like view of the universe and our place within it. As adults, we all too often lose that sense of wonder we had in our formative years and which made us look at the world in a completely different way. The transition to adulthood inevitably leads to the world's becoming disenchanted, evacuated of all mystery. As a consequence, our whole outlook on life becomes much narrower, less imaginative.

That is certainly the position that the aviator finds himself in. For him, seeing is believing. He cannot therefore conceive of anything beneath the surface, of all the wondrous insights conveyed by the heart and the imagination. In other words, he's a typical adult. Back in the so-called civilized world that may be all well and good, but out here in the desert, it's a different matter entirely. If the aviator is to survive in this literal and spiritual waste land, he needs to follow the example of the little prince and think, not just with his brain, but with his heart, his soul, his entire being. In short, he needs to get in touch with his inner child.

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The moral lesson conveyed in The Little Prince is that life is only worth living when it is lived for others, not for oneself. The Little Prince lives on his asteroid in peace, taking care of his volcanoes and watching his sunsets. One day a rose appears on his asteroid, and he is intrigued by her, but he soon becomes offended by her conceit and her false words. He leaves her. On his travels, which ultimately lead him to Earth, he has a chance to view and evaluate many types of people. Most of the people he meets live only for themselves and don't invest their lives in anyone else. The king wants only to command. The conceited man lives only to be admired. The tippler only wants to drink so he can forget that he is ashamed of his drinking. The businessman wants to own everything without being of any use to the things he owns. What all these men have in common is that they are completely selfish, living only for themselves. 

When he reaches the planet of the lamplighter, he summarizes: "That man ... is the only one of them all who does not seem to me ridiculous. Perhaps that is because he is thinking of something else besides himself."

The farther away he gets from his flower, the more he realizes that it was his job to appreciate and protect her, not to get something from her. But when he comes to the garden of roses, he cries because he thinks his flower is not unique, as she had told him. 

The fox is the one who teaches the Little Prince the moral lesson clearly. He teaches him what it means to be tamed by someone--which is basically growing to love that person. After taming the fox, the Little Prince realizes that his rose is unique, because she is his rose, and he cares for her. The fox then shares his secret:

"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye. ... You become responsible forever, for what you have tamed. You are responsible for your rose."

This secret sums up the moral lesson of the book: Life is meaningful when it is filled with caring relationships.

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