The Veldt Questions and Answers
by Ray Bradbury

Start Your Free Trial

What is the mood, the author's purpose, and the sensory language in "The Veldt?" 

Expert Answers info

Gaia Chandler, M.A. eNotes educator | Certified Educator

briefcaseEditor, Professional Writer

bookB.A. from DELHI UNIVERSITY

bookM.A. from DELHI UNIVERSITY

bookM.A. from ASIAN COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM


calendarEducator since 2019

write124 answers

starTop subjects are Literature and History

Sensory language is important in Ray Bradbury’s “The Veldt” (1950) because the world created by Mr. and Mrs. Hadley in their HappyLife Home is experienced wholly through a passive deployment of the senses. Gone is the “doing” aspect of experience; the parents and their two children, Wendy and Peter, live to watch, smell, and hear life go by. George and Lydia Hadley have built a home so full of creature comforts for their children, they don’t even have to walk up to their bedrooms to sleep.

“Go to bed,” he said to the children. ... They went off to the air tube, where a wind blew them like brown leaves up to their sleeping rooms.

Thus, the most active forces in the lives of the Hadleys are the machines which cook their food on autopilot and rock them to sleep each night, and the disastrous inner workings of the children’s minds. In their HappyLife Home, the children don’t even have to tie their own shoes or brush their own hair. Instead, all of the children's energy is...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 1,053 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2016

write10,860 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

check Approved by eNotes Editorial