What is the mood of the poem "Sea Fever"?

The mood of the poem "Sea Fever" is one of yearning to be back on the sea.

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The mood of a poem is the kind of emotion it raises, or means to raise, in the reader. In "Sea Fever," the mood is one of deep and wistful longing to be back on the sea.

The speaker, on land, yearns to be on the seas, experiencing...

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The mood of a poem is the kind of emotion it raises, or means to raise, in the reader. In "Sea Fever," the mood is one of deep and wistful longing to be back on the sea.

The speaker, on land, yearns to be on the seas, experiencing what he remembers as the freedom and thrill of voyaging. These include feeling the wind hit him, seeing the white clouds "flying" overhead, feeling the ocean's spray striking him, and hearing the sound of the seagulls' cries. This part of nature calls to him in a "wild" way and a "clear" way, inviting him back home.

Even the parts of the sea that might be less appealing to the average person beckon to the speaker. He longs for the "lonely" feeling of the sea and for "grey" mists and dawns. These images evoke freedom to him: on the sea it just him and the natural world.

The speaker realizes in the third stanza of the poem that he needs to fulfill his longing to be on the water. He says he "must" go, and he compares what is ahead of him to the wandering "gypsy life," another image of freedom.

The poem evokes the Anglo-Saxon poem called "The Seafarer" that has a similar mood. Masefield also uses similar literary devices as the earlier poem, such as alliteration.

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