What is the mood of "Araby"?

The mood of "Araby" is gloomy and dreary. James Joyce creates this mood through his use of setting, imagery, and diction. The mood becomes optimistic when the narrator speaks of his love interest, but it again becomes solemn when the narrator's romantic hopes are dashed.

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The mood of a literary work is how it makes the reader feel. Mood is conveyed through setting, imagery, and word choice. This is not to be confused with tone, which is the author's attitude about the subject matter.

The mood of James Joyce's short story "Araby ...

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The mood of a literary work is how it makes the reader feel. Mood is conveyed through setting, imagery, and word choice. This is not to be confused with tone, which is the author's attitude about the subject matter.

The mood of James Joyce's short story "Araby" is solemn, gloomy, and dismal. He achieves this mood through his crafting of the story's setting, his use of dreary imagery, and his diction.

The story is set on North Richmond Street in Dublin, Ireland. The dead-end street is empty and quiet, with the exception of the noise made by playing children when school lets out. The children seem to be unaware of the moroseness of their surroundings. The story takes place in the dark, cold winter. The narrator makes grim references to the death of a priest, "dark dripping gardens," "dark odorous stables," and other dim and dreary things. The narrator contemplates his love for his friend's sister in a dark drawing room on a cold, rainy evening.

The story's mood remains somber except for when the narrator is speaking of Mangan's sister, whom he adores. At such times, the mood becomes cheery and hopeful, with images of light that counter the story's general gloom. At the conclusion of the story, however, the narrator's hopes are dashed and the mood again becomes somber.

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