What is the meaning of the poem "The Border: A Double Sonnet" by Alberto Rios?

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In "The Border: A Double Sonnet," Alberto Ríos uses a sequence of metaphors to attack the divisive, disruptive, dangerous, and unnatural nature of borders. He implies that borders are unnatural when he says that "The border is a line that birds cannot see," and "The border says stop to the...

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In "The Border: A Double Sonnet," Alberto Ríos uses a sequence of metaphors to attack the divisive, disruptive, dangerous, and unnatural nature of borders. He implies that borders are unnatural when he says that "The border is a line that birds cannot see," and "The border says stop to the wind, but the wind . . . keeps going." He implies that borders are disruptive when he says that "The border is a belt that is too tight . . . making it hard to breathe," and "The border is the blood clot in the river's vein." And he implies that borders are divisive when we says that "The border is where flint first met steel, starting a century of fires," and "The border is a brand, the "Double-X" of barbed wire scarred into the skin of so many."

The borders in this poem could refer to geographical borders, which divide people from one another, and which often, as in the conflict between Israel and Palestine, are a cause of war and violence. The borders could also refer to figurative borders, or barriers between people, such as those barriers created by racial, political or religious prejudices. These figurative borders are often just as divisive and just as dangerous as physical, geographical borders—and, in fact, often precede those physical borders.

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