WHat is the meaning of the following quote from Romeo and Juliet: "Come, come with me, and we will make short work. For by your leaves, you shall not stay alone Till holy church incorporate two in one."

The quote "Come, come with me, and we will make short work" means that Friar Lawrence wants the job to be done quickly. In other words, he wants to marry Romeo and Juliet as soon as possible. Friar Lawrence wants to get it over quickly as he's keen to ensure that Romeo and Juliet consummate their love within the bonds of marriage.

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Friar Lawrence recognizes that Romeo and Juliet are deeply in love. He also recognizes that theirs is a very physical love, which will soon be consummated if the two love-birds are left alone. So to keep things respectable, he proposes that Romeo and Juliet get married as soon as possible. This way, Romeo will be able to make an honest woman of Juliet.

The Friar could be accused of having acted irresponsibly in encouraging Romeo and Juliet's love. Whatever the truth of this accusation, there's no doubt that he's now playing the part of the responsible adult to perfection. Love is one thing, but consummating it is an entirely different matter altogether. And for Friar Lawrence, as a man of God, such physical consummation should only take place within the bonds of marriage.

In those days, sex outside marriage was frowned upon, especially among the upper classes. In his haste to marry Romeo and Juliet, Friar Lawrence is showing his fidelity to society's prevailing values, even if he's violated others by encouraging the star-cross'd lovers' illicit relationship. Encouraging Romeo and Juliet to defy their parents is one thing, but encouraging them to have sex outside marriage is quite another. The latter is one step too far for Friar Lawrence, and to prevent that from happening, it's all the more imperative that he makes things respectable as quickly as possible.

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This quote is Friar Lawrence's comment on the impending marriage of Romeo and Juliet. It occurs at the very end of Act II. When the young couple meets at Friar Lawrence's room, they begin to express their ardent love for one another when Juliet enters the room. Friar Lawrence's comment reveals his opinion that they ought to be married soon.

When he says he will "make short work," he means that the marriage will take place shortly. He then explains that it needs to happen soon because they might get overly anxious to consummate the relationship if left "alone" / "by [their] leaves." The final line refers to the blessing of the marriage in the Church. They will have an official sacrament performed by the Friar so that their union will be "Holy." If they did not have this sanctified union, their coupling would be considered sinful. Friar Lawrence can tell that the two lovers are eager to spend time alone, but they can only do that if they are officially married. In the sacrament of marriage, "two" become "one" through their union.

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In the passage quoted from Act II, Scene 6, Friar Lawrence has agreed to perform the marriage ceremony for Romeo and Juliet. Knowing that they might sin together if they are left alone, he feels it is better that they be married quickly.

In Act II Friar Lawrence has previously tried to reason with Romeo by explaining that acting on impulse is never wise:

These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which, as they kiss, consume. (2.6.9-11)
 
Now, having failed to convince Romeo to act rationally, Friar Lawrence decides to be sure that Romeo and Juliet at least act morally. By joining them in marriage, the Friar hopes to unite the lovers and, in doing so, to unify the families.
 
Unfortunately, this hopeful plan is one that has little chance of succeeding because Romeo and Juliet's marriage intensifies the conflict rather than mitigating it. Marriages among families of the upper classes in Verona are arranged. We see evidence of this expectation through Paris, who asks Lord Capulet for Juliet's hand in marriage rather than proposing directly to Juliet. There are no "love" marriages like that of Romeo and Juliet, who have acted without the permission of their parents.
 
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Juliet has been given time to go to church and Romeo has arranged to meet her at Friar Laurence's cell.  When they arrive they cannot contain themselves and exchange a great deal of kissing and caressing.  Friar Laurence tells them to follow him and he will not take very long in marrying them.  He tells them that they will no longer beliving separate lives, but the church will join them as man and wife forever.  They will become one in the eyes of God.

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Here is a link to the part of the play where the line is said:

LINK

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Because the two young people are so anxiously amorous toward each other, Friar Laurence is very anxious to geth them married for fear that they may do something sinful before they are married. "Come, come with me, and we'll do the job quickly. Because if you don't mind, I'm not leaving you two alone until you're united in marriage."

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Friar Laurence speaks these words to Romeo and Juliet in Act II, scene 6. The young lovers have just arrived at the Friar's cell in order for him to marry them. He's just telling them to hurry in, and the vows they take will soon join them together as one.

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