What is the meaning of Portia's metaphor "Dwell I but in the suburbs / Of your good pleasure?" in Julius Caesar?

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Portia notices that Brutus is not himself. He cannot sleep, and he seems preoccupied with the events at hand. In addition, he is not confiding in her as he usually does. The couple typically discusses everything together, so it is odd that he is not sharing his thoughts with Portia....

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Portia notices that Brutus is not himself. He cannot sleep, and he seems preoccupied with the events at hand. In addition, he is not confiding in her as he usually does. The couple typically discusses everything together, so it is odd that he is not sharing his thoughts with Portia. When he tells her that he is sick, she knows him too well to believe the lie.

Portia is offended that her husband is becoming so secretive. She calls upon Brutus to confide his troubles in her, if their marriage vows mean anything to him. Portia reminds him that she is his wife, so she should know what is worrying him. She questions whether he sees her only as a wife to sleep with or have meals with in this quote.

Dwell I but in the suburbs
of your good pleasure?

Roughly translated, she is asking if her place in the marriage is on the outside of his happiness. Portia is reminding Brutus that she is there to share in everything with him, whether it’s good or bad. She follows up this question with the bold statement that she is his “harlot, not his wife” if he cannot share everything with her.

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