What is the main idea in Shiraz Dossa's article "Slicing up 'development': Colonialism, political theory, ethics"?

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The article "Slicing up 'development': Colonialism, political theory, ethics" was written by Shiraz Dossa in the 2000s and has been cited by a number of publications, which makes it an influential part of the academic debate in this area of study. The article takes a hard look at the international economy and political situation. Specifically, it focuses on the relationship between the developed Western world and the developing "global south."

The main idea that Dossa develops in this article is that Western powers have helped countries from the global south develop for their own reasons rather than out of the kindness of their hearts. More specifically, he says:

Development was not devised to develop the South; it was invented to advance Western development and Western hegemony.

This, he argues, is why development programs in many countries have failed to actually make life better for the majority of people in those countries. He argues this isn't a mistake or an anomaly; it's a feature of Western development outreach. He says that Western countries want the global south to develop only to the point of being able to act as a cheap force of labor and production for Western economies. Dossa describes this as a new kind of colonization. Essentially, the countries in these development programs act as a colony would for its colonizers. They export what Western economies need to continue functioning at the expense of real development that could help the average person in the country have a better life.

Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on April 14, 2020
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