What is the main conflict that Katniss must face in The Hunger Games?

The main conflict that Katniss must face in The Hunger Games is overcoming the egregious socioeconomic inequality that exists within her society. Residents of poorer districts, such as District 12, where she lives, must starve and work very hard to feed the residents of the richer districts and the Capitol. Katniss is appalled by the corruption and luxury of these upper-class residents and determines to put an end to social inequality through revolution.

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In The Hunger Games, the conflicts that Katniss must overcome are revealed as the story progresses, and each new chapter raises the stakes of these conflicts higher and higher. Some of the more obvious conflicts are Katniss’s determination to save her sister, Prim, from the horror of fighting to the death when she is selected to participate in the Hunger Games; her need to come to terms with her love for Peeta over Gale (which is, spoiler, revealed in the final book of the trilogy); and her need to survive the extraordinary challenges she faces just trying to stay alive in the games themselves.

However, I think that a much deeper conflict that resonates throughout the series is Katniss’s struggle to confront and break down the socioeconomic inequality that exists in her world. The reader is told early on that people from District 12, where she lives, have barely enough food to survive and must work dangerous and exhausting jobs mining coal for the Capitol. Because the children of wealthier districts, such as District 1, do not have to toil all day just to make ends meet, they are able to train year-round for the Hunger Games, which gives them a significant advantage over the other contestants. The residents of the Capitol are portrayed as hopelessly aloof and spoiled. While citizens of poorer districts starve, the Capitol residents are so wealthy that they actually regurgitate food that they eat at lavish parties so that their stomachs will empty and they can try other samples. This is the moment, I believe, where a horrified Katniss decides that she must break down these social inequalities by engaging in a violent revolution with the Capitol.

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The main conflict Katniss faces in the novel The Hunger Games is the struggle to survive. There are many ancillary struggles, and the sequels follow even different conflicts, but the primary force in the first novel is the need for survival. She is trapped in an arena with 23 other children, and they are pitted against one another to fight to the death and survive the elements.

Katniss joins forces with a young girl named Rue, who eventually dies, and then later joins back up with Peeta, her companion from District 12. They support each other in their struggle against the elements and the other competitors, and eventually, they trick the game makers into letting both of them survive even though the rules state that only one is allowed to be victorious.

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The main conflict Katniss faces is having to kill other people to stay alive during the Hunger Games.

Katniss's strength and personality get her into this difficult situation. When her fragile younger sister is chosen to represent District 12 in the Hunger Games, the stronger, more protective Katniss feels compelled to go in her place. Katniss knows her sister would never survive. Nevertheless, she hates the idea of providing entertainment to the decadent people of the Capitol, who have too much fine food to eat while she and her own people go hungry, and she especially hates the idea that to survive, she must kill Peeta, to whom she has grown close.

The novel shows the struggles and dilemmas of people who have nothing and, therefore, little choice but to be part of cruel situations they would prefer to avoid. Though young, Katniss is forced to carry the weight of the world on her shoulders and to take care of others any way she can. She shows resourcefulness and pluck in facing the conflict of weighing her personal survival against her desire to live in a humane way.

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Many writers and editors may tell you that conflict is the key to good drama and the Hunger Games is filled with conflict!

But here we want to focus on the MAIN conflict for Katniss throughout the course of the books. 

Throughout the three books, she faces quite a few challenges in quite a few situations and settings, so what is the constant throughout all of those? The constant is Katniss.

The true drama (conflict) of the book is Katniss dealing with balancing her own self-doubt and her extraordinary abilities.

These books were written with a younger audience in mind, a younger audience that is dealing with figuring out who they are while they are being pulled in several directions, by their families, friends, and educators.

Katniss is facing a similar journey, she needs to determine what she wants for herself, while her family has their expectations. Her friends have their expectations. And her mentors have their expectations of her. 

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There are many conflicts in the Hunger Games. This is one of the reasons why it is a genuine pager-turner. 

At first the main conflict of the book is her survival in the games itself. As she represents her district, she has to survive. Within this context, she has to battle others, the elements, and even her own sense of what is right and wrong. In a dystopian world, inner conflicts always exist. 

There is also a conflict in her feeling between Gale and Peeta. Whom does she really love? 

On a broader level there is a conflict with the Capitol city. Katniss realizes more and more that the Capitol is evil and that she and other need to overcome it. Here is a quote that show this point:

Listen up. You're in trouble. Word is the Capitol's furious about you showing them up in the arena. The one thing they can't stand is being laughed at and they're the joke of Panem.

To be more specific, she also have a conflict with president Snow. 

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