What is the main conflict of A Raisin in the Sun?

There are many conflicts in Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun, both internal and external. The main conflicts in the play are the Younger family's struggles with financial hardship, prejudice, and racism.

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Lorraine Hansberry's play A Raisin in the Sun focuses on the Youngers: a Black family living in poverty in Chicago's south side. The play features many conflicts, both internal and external, but the primary conflicts are the Youngers' struggles with financial hardship and racism.

The Youngers live in a...

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Lorraine Hansberry's play A Raisin in the Sun focuses on the Youngers: a Black family living in poverty in Chicago's south side. The play features many conflicts, both internal and external, but the primary conflicts are the Youngers' struggles with financial hardship and racism.

The Youngers live in a dilapidated apartment in a poor neighborhood. The apartment only has two bedrooms and is home to four adults and a child. It is falling apart, as is the furniture in it. The Youngers dream of having a nicer home and better lives. Walter is unhappy with his job as a limousine driver. Beneatha wants to become a doctor. Lena has always dreamed of owning a house.

Lena receives a $10,000 life insurance payment after her husband's death. It seems that there is hope for the family to realize its dreams. Lena gives much of the money to Walter to invest in a liquor store with his friends, with the stipulation that he put aside $3,000 for Beneatha's schooling. Walter gives all of the money to his friend, including Beneatha's share, and his friend flees with it. Lena is able to make a down payment on a house with some of the remaining money.

The Youngers face racism and prejudice when attempting to buy a home in a White neighborhood. Their future neighbors send a man named Karl Lindner to offer them a large sum of money to not move into their neighborhood. Walter initially plans to accept the offer, but the Youngers ultimately decide to move to their new home in spite of their unwelcome reception by their new neighbors.

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