The Kite Runner Questions and Answers
by Khaled Hosseini

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What is the main conflict in the novel The Kite Runner?

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There are actually a number of ways to answer this question, but the conflict that we have the most insight into is Amir's internal conflict. This internal conflict is with him his entire life, in part because he feels he is to blame for his mother's death in childbirth and for his father's indifference toward him. However, the inner struggle intensifies after the kite-fighting tournament. Because it is so important to him to win the tournament, Amir watches his friend Hassan be sexually assaulted (a bully is trying to take the kite from him, even though Hassan won the kite fairly) and doesn't try to intervene or get help. Amir's decision to flee the scene has lifelong ramifications, as he struggles to overcome the guilt associated with his weakness and betrayal. Amir takes more overt actions against Hassan, eventually resulting in Hassan and his father Ali leaving the house (they are servants to Baba and Amir). However, his acting out and his eventual move to California with Baba do...

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pottert4n6 | Student

The main conflict is a man vs. self conflict. Amir lets something terrible happen to Hassan and spends the rest of his life trying to make up for it. For a long time he fights his guilt and tries to repress it, but then he finally has the opportunity to actually do something about his guilt. Though the larger question of whether or not he made his penance is left up to the reader, Amir eventually resolves his conflict with himself by refraining his guilt into a call to action to nurture Hassan's son.

ninjasox911 | Student

 Well, in my opinion "The Kite Runner" is about the loss of childhood innocence; the cruelty of a hard and unforgiving world ripping the naive eyes from the boys sockets. It's also very political, however, I tend to think of the political aspects as a subplot.

~Rina