What is the lesson of the story "One of Our Future Poets, You Might Say"?

One could argue that the lesson of the story "Our of Our Future Poets, You Might Say" is that prejudice is a very foolish thing indeed. The Board of Education firmly believes that children from disadvantaged backgrounds are physically and mentally inferior. But Aram proves them wrong.

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Aram feels somewhat out of place due to his poverty and to his Armenian heritage in a land where people like him are greatly outnumbered by those regarded as authentic Americans, the white middle-class people of Northern European heritage.

Aram's uncomfortable position is made worse by the attitude of the...

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Aram feels somewhat out of place due to his poverty and to his Armenian heritage in a land where people like him are greatly outnumbered by those regarded as authentic Americans, the white middle-class people of Northern European heritage.

Aram's uncomfortable position is made worse by the attitude of the local Board of Education, which firmly believes that boys like Aram, those from disadvantaged backgrounds, are physically and intellectually inferior.

But as Aram knows full well, this is simply not the case. Not only is he smart, but like the kids in his neighborhood, he has a well-shaped head, a sound chest, and a handsome figure. For good measure, he has bags of energy and "a continuous compulsion to behave mischievously."

It's not just the members of the Board of Education who are blinded by prejudice. Presbyterian ministers wax lyrical about "the American child," and when they look into the sea of faces of the boys at Aram's school, they see "the future leaders of America." Aram can only laugh. Though some of these boys may be good baseball players, they're idiots, certainly not the stuff of which the future generations of captains of industry are made.

Aram shows up the ignorance and prejudice of these people by inhaling and exhaling without any difficulty during a medical examination carried out by the Board of Education. Aram's obvious good health clearly challenges the Board's prejudices concerning poor children, so he is hurried off the stage before he can make them look like bigger fools than they already do.

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