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What is the irony in "A Hanging" by George Orwell?

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Situational irony is a literary technique in which a particular expectation is created by the author for their readers—yet something quite the opposite happens instead.

In this story, the narrator is preparing to witness a hanging. The mood is solemn, with careful detail given to the way the hanging is carried out. The accused doesn't fight those who have condemned him; he seems resolute in his fate. It even seems as though nature itself attempts to intervene in the ending of his life, as a dog unexpectedly emerges and attempts to lick the man's face. (This is ironic itself, as dogs are known to show no form of friendliness to strangers who are aggressive. This characterizes the condemned man as one whose spirit attracts the favor of an unknown dog.) The man is perfectly healthy and even sidesteps a puddle, not wanting to get his feet wet (ironic because within minutes, he will have no further need for those feet). His captors share no joy in this hanging; they wish to get it over with...

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