What is the importance of the concept of horizons? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel's final sentences in this regard?

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The idea of the "horizon" in the story Their Eyes Were Watching God is the concept of limitations and boundaries—it's how far a person's life extends. If someone's horizon has expanded, it means they have grown as a person, are more capable, and have more strength and opportunity in their...

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The idea of the "horizon" in the story Their Eyes Were Watching God is the concept of limitations and boundaries—it's how far a person's life extends. If someone's horizon has expanded, it means they have grown as a person, are more capable, and have more strength and opportunity in their life.

Janie has several relationships, and they all serve to expand her horizon. In her first marriage to Jody, Janie feels trapped and unhappy constantly. She begins to realize that the marriage is worthless and oppressive and that she wants more out of her life than to be trapped with Jody. This helps her gain independence and strength.

In her relationship to Tea Cake, she begins to learn what it means to have a fulfilling relationship and to know someone who takes care of her in spite of what society says. The final sentence of the novel illustrates this because she finally found happiness and satisfaction and grew to be a satisfied, mature woman—and Tea Cake will always be with her, even in his death.

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Janie's first husband is chosen for her. She has little say in the matter of this marriage, and complies with her grandmother out of respect. As she matures, her self-awareness increases, and she finds in Jody-therealization that there is more to life than her own backyard.
While her marriage to Jody turns into an empty shell, she gains a backbone, and continues to develop her sense of self
Janie and Tea Cake have the closest example of a true partnership. Janie has finally been able to define what a fulfilling relationship should be, and follows her heart-and does not care about the public's perceptions. This is different than her other two marriages.
The final sentences are her realization of the journey she has taken, that although Tea Cake died, she achieved her goal of a satisfying relationship-and that he will still be a part of her in spirit.

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