What is the importance of group social work?  

Group social work is important because it provides people with a support network and reduces feelings of isolation and helplessness. Furthermore, being in a group setting will help people to learn how to behave in a social setting going forward.

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Group work is vital to the effectiveness of social work in general. It has long been acknowledged that social workers are much more effective in their jobs if they have experience in their training and education with interacting with others at a group level.

In essence, the practice of social...

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Group work is vital to the effectiveness of social work in general. It has long been acknowledged that social workers are much more effective in their jobs if they have experience in their training and education with interacting with others at a group level.

In essence, the practice of social work is relational, which is to say that that it is based on relationships between individuals—not just between social workers and the people they work for, but between social workers themselves. For social workers, group work can be particularly useful in providing mutual support in a profession that is, at the best times, highly stressful.

As regards social work practice itself, group work allows people to come together and gain strength through sharing common experiences of, for instance, drug abuse, criminality, and challenging home environments.

In such contexts, groups can allow participants to feel safe and accepted—in short, to feel that they matter. Inevitably, this tends to have a very positive effect on those from troubled backgrounds, who at no point in their lives have ever felt this way.

Far from supplanting the traditional one-to-one approach, group work actually augments it, adding a significant new dimension to the practice of social work.

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In order to help you answer your question, let me first of all explain to you what is meant with the term group social work. Social work is where social workers try to help others who are in a certain socially difficult position. For example, this could apply to homeless people, unemployed people, or children and young people who face difficulties in their home life. Often, social workers work with individuals in order to help them to improve their situation. However, in some instances, group social work might be chosen instead of working with individuals. Here, a social worker works with a group of people, who often are from a similar background or who share a similar problem. This is a very useful method of social work for a number of reasons.

Firstly, you might want to look at the fact that being among people who have had similar experiences to your own will help people feel less isolated. For example, it might help a homeless person if they are trying to deal with their situation in a group setting, as they will see that they are not the only ones who are struggling with taking back control of their life. They can draw strength and support from this newly found community of people in a similar situation, as they will feel less alone, less isolated, and more understood and accepted by their peers.

Furthermore, you might also want to point out that group social work also helps people to establish or rediscover their social skills. Very often, social workers work with people who struggle with social norms and conventions or who struggle in a social setting. By being in a group with other people, these people can learn how to act and behave towards others in a secure setting, without risking being penalized. They can slowly learn that it is possible to trust others, which will have a very beneficial impact on them once they return back to their place in society.

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Group social work is the process through which a social worker guides people in a group so that they can learn to relate to others more constructively and experience personal and communal growth. Groups can help individuals by using the group as a tool to help people change behaviors. By learning to interact better with others, people in the group can develop their ability to contribute to not only their own growth but also that of the community through communal action. The outcome of the group is in part the personal growth of its members; the importance of the group also lies in its ability to foster the communal responsibility of its members. The group can function as a way for individuals to improve their self-esteem and their ability to contribute to the society at large. Therefore, group social work is an important process through which social workers can affect not only personal growth but also foster communal development through empowering the group members to contribute to their society. 

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One person cannot change the world alone, first of all. People working together can accomplish more. The moe important reason for social work being done in groups is that it's emotionally difficult work. Having someone in the trenches with you makes all the difference.
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Group social work comprises a number of various practices and techniques aimed at facilitating individual growth and development in a social setting. An example of group work would be anti-violence trainings for perpetrators of domestic violence. In this setting, offenders have the ability to examine their feelings, histories, and behaviors in a nonthreatening environment. Group work is important because human beings are social and relational by nature. Thus, we are able to learn about ourselves in the context of a group more easily than in isolation. Group encounters allow us to incorporate the insights and perspectives of others into our own pool of resources. Also, group work can be perceived as less invasive than one-on-one social work. Participants may be more likely to open themselves up in the context of a group.
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