What is the impact of unemployment on society?

The most obvious impact of unemployment on society is economic, as unemployed people have less money to spend, which means businesses don't profit as much. There are also social consequences to unemployment. Unemployed people may suffer from depression or other mental health issues, and they may struggle to provide for their families, especially when it comes to healthcare and nutrition. 

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Unemployment, if it is high enough, can have many impacts on society.  These impacts can be economic, but they can also be seen in areas like crime and the family.

The most obvious impact of unemployment is that it hurts the economy.  People who are unemployed have less money to spend.  They are able to buy fewer goods and services, thus making businesses less profitable.  This can lead, in turn, to even more unemployment.  High unemployment, then, has very negative economic impacts.

Unemployment can impact society in ways that go beyond its economic impact.  For example, unemployment can be very psychologically hard on a worker.  It can make that person doubt his or her value as a person.  This can lead to stress within that person’s relationships.  Unemployed people are less likely to get married and more likely to get divorced as their lack of work puts stress on them.  Stress can also lead to poorer health in the unemployed, which is exacerbated if they have less access to health care than they previously did.  Finally, unemployment can potentially lead to crime.  A person who has no job still needs the necessities of life.  Such a person may turn to crime to be able to get the things he or she needs.

There are many other ways in which unemployment impacts society.  In general, it can have both an economic impact and an impact that is more social than economic.

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