What is the foreshadowing/irony that opens act 5 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet?

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The foreshadowing/irony that opens act V of Shakespeare's tragedyRomeo and Julietcomes in the form of a monologue delivered by Romeo , while he is in exile, about a dream he had that has put him in a wonderful mood and made him believe that he may...

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The foreshadowing/irony that opens act V of Shakespeare's tragedy Romeo and Juliet comes in the form of a monologue delivered by Romeo, while he is in exile, about a dream he had that has put him in a wonderful mood and made him believe that he may soon be receiving wonderful news. He describes the dream that has so lifted his spirits as follows:

"I dreamt my lady came and found me dead—
Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave
to think!—
And breathed such life with kisses in my lips,
That I revived, and was an emperor."

This dream is a vision of the exact opposite of what will happen at the end of the play, and thus it serves as both foreshadowing and irony. Ultimately, it is Romeo who will find Juliet "dead," and rather than kiss her back to life, he will take his own life before she has a chance to revive.

There is a more immediate irony at work in this scene as well. Just following the lines in which Romeo predicts he will be getting good news soon, Balthazar arrives and delivers the (false) news of Juliet's death. While Romeo was right that he would soon be receiving a message from Verona, he could not have been more wrong about what the content of that message would be.

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In the beginning of Act V, Romeo has been banished to Mantua. In his opening speech he mentions a dream which predicts some "joyful news" is "at hand." He also says that Juliet will find him dead but will restore him to life with her kisses. He says,

I dreamt my lady came and found me dead
(Strange dream that gives a dead man leave to
think!)
And breathed such life with kisses in my lips
That I revived and was an emperor.
Romeo's dream is partly ironic. Had he received the message from Friar Laurence about the plot involving Juliet faking her death, he would have indeed had good news. Unfortunately, the Friar's message never arrives and so the meaning of Romeo's dream is lost. In the Friar's plan, Romeo was to rescue Juliet from the tomb, taking her away to Mantua to be reunited in their love. Fate intervenes in the form of a plague threat in Verona which delays the message.
 
The dream also foreshadows events in the Capulet tomb later in Act V. After Romeo has killed himself with poison, Juliet wakes up to find him dead next to her. She attempts to kiss some of the poison off his lips but they are dry. The kiss is foreshadowed in Romeo's lines. Juliet finally uses Romeo's dagger to kill herself. 
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