What is the feeling or mood in "The Listeners" ? How does the poet create the mood ?

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Mood is a really cool thing to talk about concerning this particular poem. Mood is different than tone. Tone is the writer's attitude about something, and mood is the feeling a piece of literature arouses in the reader. Different readers might describe the mood of this poem using different words;...

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Mood is a really cool thing to talk about concerning this particular poem. Mood is different than tone. Tone is the writer's attitude about something, and mood is the feeling a piece of literature arouses in the reader. Different readers might describe the mood of this poem using different words; however, the words that each reader chooses are probably synonyms of each other. Some words that I would choose to describe the mood of this poem are foreboding, haunting, suspenseful, tense, and nervous. The setting is a good place to begin answering why those mood words work. The setting is at night and in a forested area. That is immediately more nerve wracking than a brightly lit meadow. Additionally, the man is knocking on the door of a house that is apparently abandoned. If it's not abandoned, then it's presently unoccupied, or the house is occupied and they are silently watching the man. That's tense stuff; however, there is a set of four lines that I believe sell the suspenseful mood better than any other part of the poem.

But only a host of phantom listeners
That dwelt in the lone house then
Stood listening in the quiet of the moonlight
To that voice from the world of men:
The narrator tells readers that phantoms are standing in the house listening to a man from a different world. That's just plain spooky, and it's made creepier by the fact that readers get zero explanation as to who or what these phantom listeners might be or why they are there.
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De La Mare creates a very eerie and tense mood in The Listeners. The overall meaning of the poem is up to the interpretation of the reader. You have a traveler who visits a house where we presume he knows the occupant. However, his words are only heard by a group of phantoms or ghosts.

Setting, as always, helps create the mood. It's dark, in a forest, at a medieval or gothic castle/mansion (the place has a turret). He uses descriptive words and phrases like "moonlit door," "leaf-fringed sill," "faint moonbeams on the dark stair,"empty hall," and "shadowiness of the still house." These descriptions offer an imagery that is very tense and spooky, and possibly supernatural. The traveler is also alone and confused. This gives the reader a similar feeling of concern.

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