What is the extended metaphor in chapter 8 of Lord of the Flies?

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Yes, the parachuist and his ruin is a metaphor for the spiritual ruin of man. Innately evil, man is further corrupted by wars and civilization is in ruin as a result. His tattered and torn body is comparable to the spiritual destruction of the soul of man.

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The most obvious extended metaphor in chapter eight is the Lord of the Flies.  Golding uses the symbolic ruin of the fly-bloated sow's head to represent decay, corruption, and evil-personified in the Lord of the Flies.  Simon's conversation with the Lord of the Flies reveals that the true evil on the island lurks within the boys themselves.

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One metaphor is the beast.  The beast is a running extended metaphor throughout the book.  The boys fear the beast, but are not sure if it exists.  The beast is a manifestation of the evil that exists inside them.  Many refuse to accept this evil, just as many boys refuse to accept the beast.

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