What is the exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution for 1984?

The exposition of 1984 occurs at the opening of the novel, when Winston Smith, Oceania, and the role of Big Brother are introduced. The rising action includes Winston's infatuation and affair with Julia and his diary entries. The climax is when Winston and Julia are arrested by the Thought Police, and the falling action is when Winston is tortured at the Ministry of Love. The resolution is when Winston is released and realizes his love for Big Brother.

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1984's exposition can be found as Orwell establishes the world of 1984 through the viewpoint of his protagonist, Winston Smith . We observe the deteriorating condition of his flat and the oppression of the regime he works for and detests, while also being introduced to other characters in...

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1984's exposition can be found as Orwell establishes the world of 1984 through the viewpoint of his protagonist, Winston Smith. We observe the deteriorating condition of his flat and the oppression of the regime he works for and detests, while also being introduced to other characters in the world, most importantly Julia and O'Brien.

As the book continues, we follow the story's rising action, with Winston and Julia entering into an unsanctioned relationship with one another. Another key moment is his recruitment by O'Brien into the Brotherhood, which aims at the overthrow of the Party. It is in the context of his recruitment that he receives The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism.

Where this analysis becomes tricky is identifying the story's climax and falling action. In certain respects, I think you can identify three possible climaxes, the first of which is Winston's sudden arrest by the Thought Police that marks the end of book 2. Additionally, there is his torture by rats, under which he breaks. However, my own instinct would be to place the story's climax in Winston's conversations with O'Brien, particularly their exchange in chapter 3, book 3. This serves as the analytic core of the book, where Orwell lays to root the Party's core motivations of domination and control, which lie behind everything else in the book (while comprising the centerpiece in Orwell's own critique of totalitarian power structures).

After the climax, we observe the falling action, with Winston ultimately breaking under torture and submitting entirely to the will of the State.

Interestingly, I think there's a strong argument that 1984's resolution is implied rather than explicitly stated. If you notice, after the story's ending, Orwell includes an appendix: The Principles of Newspeak. If you are aware of the wider analysis of 1984, I think Margaret Atwood made a very important insight when she noted that this ending, which is presented as an academic analysis (one which appears to have been written within the world of 1984), actually implies English socialism's eventual collapse. By this reading, even though Winston himself might have been broken, at some unknown point in the future, this totalitarian state does fall.

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The exposition takes place at the beginning of the story and introduces the audience to Winston Smith and the dystopian nation of Oceania. The audience learns about the oppressive, authoritative government and Big Brother's omnipotent role as the nation's fearless leader. They also learn that Winston works in the Ministry of Truth, fabricating historical documents and records. Winston's bleak existence is illustrated and the audience sympathizes with the protagonist's oppressed life, which is completely controlled by the government.

The rising action includes Winston's rebellious journal entries, his introduction to Julia, and his subsequent affair. The rising action also includes Winston briefly experiencing independence, his attempt to join the Brotherhood, and his enlightening meeting with O'Brien.

The climax of the story takes place when Winston and Julia are suddenly arrested by the Thought Police in their rented apartment above Mr. Charrington's antique shop.

The falling action includes Winston's experience in the Ministry of Love and his torture at the hands of O'Brien. One could also include Winston's terrifying experience in Room 101 as part of the falling action as well as his betrayal of Julia and acceptance that 2+2=5. Once Winston accepts the illogical math problem, he is completely broken and no longer himself.

The resolution includes Winston's release back into society, where he eventually meets Julia but no longer has feelings for her. As he sits in the Chestnut Tree Cafe, Winston feels nothing but love and admiration for Big Brother, which proves that the Party has successfully converted him into an orthodox Party member.

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In 1984, the exposition of the story takes place in the opening chapters in which the reader learns about life in Oceania. More specifically, the reader learns how the Party controls people, like Winston, through the telescreens, the Thought Police, and the Two Minutes Hate. We also see how the people live in poverty and deprivation, as shown by the crumbing and dilapidated Victory Mansions. 

As part of the exposition, the reader is also introduced to Winston and his feelings of frustration and hatred toward Big Brother and the Party. 

The rising action consists of many different events which build to the story's climax. Winston's meeting with Julia and his meeting with O'Brien (and initiation into the Brotherhood) are some examples. These contribute to the story's suspense and tension. 

The falling action takes place in the final chapter of the story when Julia meets with Winston in the café. In this final meeting, it is revealed that in Room 101 they both betrayed each other. 

Finally, the resolution occurs in the closing paragraph. Winston loves Big Brother. He, therefore, now embodies everything that he once hated and fought to destroy.

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The rising action is the introduction of the main characters, the setting and the main conflict in the book. It's the part where we learn about Winston and his life and what problems he must deal with. The rising action continues until the climax, and the climax occurs when Winston is tortured to the point that he says he loves Big Brother. After the climax, there is the falling action, which sometimes acts as the resolution as well. The falling action is shown when Winston is in the café after getting out of prison, and he remembers his meeting with Julia at the end of book three.

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Exposition: As the novel opens, Winston Smith, a member of the Outer Party from Oceania, feels frustrated by the oppression and rigid control of the Party, which prohibits free thought, sex, and any expression of individuality. Winston dislikes the party and has illegally purchased a diary in which to write his criminal thoughts.

Rising Action: Winston works in the Ministry of Truth. He alters historical records to fit the needs of the Party. He is troubled by the Party’s control of history: the Party claims that Oceania has always been allied with Eastasia in a war against Eurasia, but Winston seems to recall a time when this was not true. The Party also claims that Emmanuel Goldstein, the alleged leader of the Brotherhood, is the most dangerous man alive, but this does not seem plausible to Winston, as his hatred for the Party grows more and more intense. At last, he receives the message that he has been waiting for: O’Brien wants to see him.

Climax: Winston’s torture with the cage of rats in Room 101.

Falling Action: Winston’s time in the café following his release from prison, including the memory of his meeting with Julia at the end of Book Three.

Resolution: Winston’s spirit is broken and he is released to the outside world. He meets Julia, but no longer feels anything for her. He has accepted the Party entirely and has learned to love Big Brother.

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