What is the dispute between John Proctor and Thomas Putnam in act 2?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

There is no dispute between John Proctor and Thomas Putnam in act 2. Although John Proctor does not like Thomas Putnam and views him as an arrogant, greedy man, the two men do not exchange words in act 2 and Thomas Putnam does not even enter the scene. However, a...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

There is no dispute between John Proctor and Thomas Putnam in act 2. Although John Proctor does not like Thomas Putnam and views him as an arrogant, greedy man, the two men do not exchange words in act 2 and Thomas Putnam does not even enter the scene. However, a dispute between John Proctor and Thomas Putnam does take place in act 1. When Thomas Putman demands that Reverend Parris call Reverend Hale from Beverly to search the town for witchcraft, Proctor intervenes and tells him:

You cannot command Mr. Parris. We vote by name in this society, not by acreage. (Miller, 28)

Thomas Putnam responds by bringing up John Proctor's less-than-stellar church attendance record. In addition to Proctor arguing with Thomas Putnam for attempting to use his influence over Reverend Parris, the two men also argue over lumber and territory. When Proctor asks Giles to help him haul his lumber home, Putnam accuses Proctor of stealing his lumber from his tract of land. Although Proctor mentions that he bought it from Goody Nurse, Putnam insists that the property belonged to his grandfather, which means it is now his.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

I do not really think that there is a dispute between the two men in Act II.  However, there is a dispute in Act I.

In Act I, Scene 2, there is a dispute between the two men.  It is over a couple of things.  First, Proctor does not like Putnam because the two of them have some disputes over some property.  Proctor has taken wood of the property, but Putnam thinks it is his.

Second, Putnam is trying to control Parris.  He has been behind calling Rev. Hale to come to Salem.  Proctor thinks that Putnam should not be able to control things just because he is rich.  This annoys Putnam because he feels that the town does not give him as much power as he deserves.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team