What is the conflict between Romeo and Tybalt?

The conflict between Romeo and Tybalt in Romeo and Juliet arises from the fact that they are members of warring families. Romeo is a Montague, whereas Tybalt is a Capulet. Tybalt is a headstrong young man whose love of violence is matched only by his hatred of Montagues. Romeo, for his part, tries to avoid fighting Tybalt, but this becomes impossible after Tybalt kills his best friend Mercutio.

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The bitter conflict between Romeo and Tybalt is impossible to conceive without their being part of warring families involved in a long-standing, bloody feud. Romeo is a Montague, and Tybalt is a Capulet. Simply by virtue of being on opposite sides of this deadly feud, Romeo and Tybalt are sworn...

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The bitter conflict between Romeo and Tybalt is impossible to conceive without their being part of warring families involved in a long-standing, bloody feud. Romeo is a Montague, and Tybalt is a Capulet. Simply by virtue of being on opposite sides of this deadly feud, Romeo and Tybalt are sworn enemies.

Even so, it's Tybalt who's much more committed to the maintenance of the feud. A dangerous young man with a thirst for violence, Tybalt has a vested interest in keeping the feud going, which he intends to do by killing Romeo.

For his part, Romeo is much less concerned with the feud, as can be seen by the fact that he's fallen head-over-heels in love with Juliet, who as well as being a Capulet also happens to be Tybalt's first cousin. But try as he might, Romeo can't avoid being sucked into the bitter quarrel between the two families.

This is because Tybalt, hot-tempered and full of hate as usual, has attacked Romeo's best friend, Mercutio. Romeo tries to stop the violence, but in the ensuing melee, Tybalt fatally stabs Mercutio underneath Romeo's arm. Romeo didn't want this, but now he has no choice; he has to engage Tybalt in a duel. And in that duel, Romeo gains revenge for Mercutio's death by killing Tybalt, thus ensuring his banishment from Verona as a punishment.

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