What is the climax of the book Peter Pan?

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The climax arrives in chapter 15, when Peter comes to rescue the Lost Boys and Wendy from the clutches of Captain Hook and his pirates. Tricked into capture through a ruse of Captain Hook's, the boys are on the verge of being forced to walk the plank, and Wendy has been tied to the mast to watch them die. Peter, pretending to be the ticking crocodile coming aboard, takes out one of the pirates and sneaks into the cabin. Thinking that the cabin is haunted, Bill Jukes and Cecco each enter but don't come out. The Lost Boys are made to go in for a fight to the death but burst out with Peter for the final attack. Peter insists on fighting Hook himself. The chapter ends with Hook's demise ("'Bad form,' he cried jeeringly, and went content to the crocodile") and the Lost Boy's bedtime in the pirates' bunks. The book's continuing theme of "good form" is evident in the climax: the battle between Hook and Pan is built on the idea of "good form," and even Hook's last words have to do with his desire to see Pan have "bad form" just once.

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The climax, or the culmination of the rising action of the plot, of Peter Pan by J M Barrie occurs in chapters 14 and 15 of the book when the protagonist Peter and the antagonist Captain Hook finally face off against one another as Peter tries to save Wendy and the lost boys, who have all been captured by the pirate crew. The animosity and tension between Peter and Hook has been present and growing throughout the book, and at the climax the stakes of their rivalry are at their highest. If Peter can't best Hook now, he's leaving all of his friends in grave danger. Everything has been leading to this moment. The title of chapter 15 itself seems to point to this as the climax, declaring "Hook or Me This Time."

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The climax of Peter Pan occurs when Peter confronts Hook, defeats him, and Hook goes overboard into the waiting jaws of the crocodile that had eaten his hand years before. The climax in a work is the place that has the highest tension of the entire story. Everything in the story built to the point where Peter would have to confront Hook.

Captain Hook kidnaps Wendy and the Lost Boys, bringing them to his ship where he intends to make the boys walk the plank. Peter arrives and tricks many of the pirates, causing their deaths and lowering his number of opponents. Hook is increasingly upset at what's happening and finally, enraged, goes over the edge of the ship and to the crocodile.

After the climax, things calm down and the story closes with Wendy bringing the Lost Boys back home where they're adopted. Peter chooses to stay behind because he doesn't want to grow up. Instead, he watches and visits through the years as Wendy ages and becomes the very thing he feared becoming: an adult.

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The climax of the book Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie is Peter's rescue of Wendy from Captain Hook and his pirate crew. The book is a short book, so the story moves along quite quickly, which means a reader will move through the basic plot chart diagram in short order.  

On opposite sides of the climax will be the rising action and the falling action. In Peter Pan the rising action includes Peter introducing himself and Tinkerbell to the Darling children, their flight to Neverland, Wendy's interactions with the Lost Boys, and Wendy's capture by the pirates and Captain Hook.  

The falling action of the story includes the Darlings' return to their home in the real world and Wendy saying her final goodbye to Peter Pan.

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