What is the central problem in The Winter Room?

The central problem in The Winter Room is that Uncle David becomes dejected and stops telling his stories when Wayne calls him a liar.

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The most significant problem in Gary Paulsen's novel The Winter Room is that Wayne becomes angry with Uncle David and calls him a liar. David overhears his outburst, becomes dejected, and stops telling his stories to the family in the winter room. From Eldon's perspective, and probably that of...

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The most significant problem in Gary Paulsen's novel The Winter Room is that Wayne becomes angry with Uncle David and calls him a liar. David overhears his outburst, becomes dejected, and stops telling his stories to the family in the winter room. From Eldon's perspective, and probably that of the other family members, it does not particularly matter whether David's stories are true or not: they are the family's evening entertainment. In fact, David does not claim that the exploits he describes are his own, and it is only his brother, the boys' father, who tells everyone about David's prodigious strength and skill with the axes.

It is David who solves the problem by repeating his great feat, splitting a log in two with simultaneous blows from two axes, which meet in the middle. Although the boys observe this, David does not know that they are watching and does not require anyone else's validation. It is enough for him to become young again, if only for a moment, and repeat one of the feats of strength at which he used to excel. That night, he starts to tell his stories again, showing that the problem has been resolved, he is no longer upset, and the family is united once more.

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