What is the author trying to convey about being human in "The Yellow Wallpaper"?

One idea that Charlotte Gilman is trying to convey about being human in "The Yellow Wallpaper" is that human connection and creativity is crucial to one's state of mind. Jane has been diagnosed with nervous depression but is prescribed isolation without anything to fill her time, which only makes her depression worse. She slips into insanity after her husband continually ignores her proposed solutions, showing the importance of communication between humans.

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The narrator of the story, Jane, has been diagnosed with "nervous depression." Her husband, John, is also her physician and prescribes her a treatment plan in which she is confined to one room and must engage in little to no physical activity and work, including writing. The woman describes John's...

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The narrator of the story, Jane, has been diagnosed with "nervous depression." Her husband, John, is also her physician and prescribes her a treatment plan in which she is confined to one room and must engage in little to no physical activity and work, including writing. The woman describes John's patronizing and controlling manner and how he disparages her illness. Jane writes in a journal in secret, expressing her belief that freedom, engaging activity, and work would benefit her.

These circumstances reflect the oppressive gender roles of the nineteenth century, in which women's lives are dictated by men. Jane wishes to advocate for her own health, while John belittles both her perspective and the illness she suffers from. Jane begins writing in an attempt to "relieve her mind," though this does not provide a solution to her confinement. Readers can follow the deterioration of her mental health throughout the story.

Jane fixates on the yellow wallpaper in her room and develops an obsessive urge to figure out its pattern. Jane begins to see the image of a woman "stooping down and creeping" behind the pattern, which resembles bars on a cage; this symbolizes her own state of mental and physical imprisonment. Each time John dismisses her concerns, Jane becomes more consumed in the wallpaper. Eventually Jane sees the woman in the wallpaper shaking the bars at night and moving around during the day. In an episode of psychosis, Jane tears and bites the wallpaper in order to free the woman inside. By the end of her narration, Jane has descended into insanity, seeing creeping women everywhere and convincing herself that she came out of the paper.

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