What is Sylvia's attitude about money in "A White Heron"?

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While I would not describe Sylvia as materialistic, she is certainly in awe of the ten dollars that the hunter offers her for information about where the white heron's nest is located. Sylvia is just a young girl and she lives with her grandmother on a farm; they do not...

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While I would not describe Sylvia as materialistic, she is certainly in awe of the ten dollars that the hunter offers her for information about where the white heron's nest is located. Sylvia is just a young girl and she lives with her grandmother on a farm; they do not have much, and Sylvia—after her initial fright—grows to really like the hunter, who stays with them.

The night he speaks of this reward, Sylvia dreams of a great many "wished-for treasures" that the ten dollars would purchase. The hunter speaks so lightly of the money; it is a small amount to him. However, to Sylvia the ten dollars seems like riches, just as the jack-knife he gives her seems to be a great "treasure" in her mind. She is amazed by the hunter's offer of money, but, ultimately, she cares more about nature and the heron than she does about getting the money.

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