What is some figurative language like metaphors, imagery, and similes used in the novel The Fault In Our Stars that explores the themes of death and love?

An example of figurative language used to explore the theme of death and love comes when Hazel uses a metaphor to tell her mom, “I’m a grenade and at some point I’m going to blow up and I would like to minimize the casualties.” This line tells the reader why Hazel tries to socially isolate herself and how she processes the awareness of her mortality. Green uses figurative language to help the reader understand the characters’ feelings and experiences.

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John Green’s The Fault In Our Stars is rich with figurative language that explores its themes, such as death and love. For example, consider the scene in which Hazel observes Isaac’s reaction to his girlfriend breaking up with him.

"She didn’t want to dump a blind guy," I said....

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John Green’s The Fault In Our Stars is rich with figurative language that explores its themes, such as death and love. For example, consider the scene in which Hazel observes Isaac’s reaction to his girlfriend breaking up with him.

"She didn’t want to dump a blind guy," I said. He nodded, the tears not like tears so much as a quiet metronome—steady, endless.

Here the simile used to compare the tears and the metronome emphasize how heartbroken Isaac is. A metronome is a device that measures tempo and that goes on and on until someone chooses to turn it off. This comparison helps the reader visualize the scene and understand that Isaac did not have an outburst of sadness. Instead, the image shows that he internalized his heartbreak in a quiet, painful way that he will carry with him for a long time.

Another example is when Hazel talks to her mom about how she does not want to go on dates.

I’m like. Like. I’m like a grenade, Mom. I’m a grenade and at some point I’m going to blow up and I would like to minimize the casualties, okay?

The comparison between Hazel and a grenade here highlights her awareness of her mortality. Hazel knows that there is a chance that she will die young and potentially at any moment. The image of her blowing up like a grenade shows the reader how Hazel envisions this kind of death, as one that will hurt anything in its vicinity. This comparison—stated first as a simile ("I'm like a grenade") and then as a straightforward metaphor ("I'm a grenade")—helps develop Hazel as a character and explains why she tries to socially isolate herself.

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