Secession and Civil War

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What is one way that the Confederate States of America was similar to the United States? What is one way it was different?    

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The armies of both the Confederacy and the United States were made of largely working-class young white men. This was especially true after both sides enacted a wartime draft, but allowed the rich to buy their way out of serving in the armed forces. Both sides believed that God and right was on their side—the Confederacy saw itself as the inheritor of the legacy of 1776 by fighting against a tyranny, while the United States fought to uphold the Union and constitutional government.

The Confederate Constitution was a pro-slavery document, while the United States Constitution was neither for nor against slavery. The Confederate government actively courted the help of European powers, while the United States government threatened a larger conflict if European powers intervened. The United States also had more infrastructure and manpower to draw from than the Confederacy; these would be a major factor in the Union's victory.

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There were similarities and differences between the Confederate States of America and the United States of America. One similarity was with the structure of the government. Both governments had three branches of government. The legislative branch made the laws. The executive branch carried out the laws. The judicial branch interpreted the laws.

One difference between the Confederate States of America and the United States of America was that the President of the Confederacy could only serve one term as President. The length of that term was six years. The President of the United States served a four-year term. There were no limits, at the time, on the number of terms the President of the United States could serve.

Another major difference is that the Confederacy allowed slavery to exist. It was written into their constitution. The U.S. constitution didn't outlaw slavery, but didn't endorse it either. After the Civil War, the U.S. officially banned slavery with the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment.  

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