What is Mrs. Mallard’s opinion about people who behave with "good intentions"? What does this tell us about the real way Brently seemed to feel about his wife?

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The text of "The Story of an Hour" does not actually contain that exact quote. About halfway through the story readers are told about "a kind intention" and a "cruel intention." I believe that the "kind intention" is what this question is asking about.

The quote comes shortly...

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The text of "The Story of an Hour" does not actually contain that exact quote. About halfway through the story readers are told about "a kind intention" and a "cruel intention." I believe that the "kind intention" is what this question is asking about.

The quote comes shortly after Mrs. Mallard realizes that she is free of her husband. The realization is a bit of a shock to her and readers, because it shows that Mrs. Mallard is excited about life to come without her husband. This immediately paints a very different picture of marriage than most readers are likely used to. The story goes on to say that Mrs. Mallard would have no one to live for in the coming years. She could live for herself without anybody else's will and desires forcing her to squash her own dreams. The text says that men tend to believe that they can impose their wills on their wives. The intention may be kind (good) or cruel; however, the intention does not matter. The imposed will happens regardless of intent.

What the quote says about the "real" Brently is a subjective reader decision. Personally, I don't think that the real Brently looks down on his wife. I don't think his feelings for her are diminished. I fully believe that he loves his wife. What the imposed will shows is Brently's attitude, beliefs, and feelings about marriage. He loves his wife, but he believes that her dreams are secondary to his. He is ignorant of the fact that his wife has dreams and desires. The quote might show that he thinks of his wife as his second-in-command rather than a fully fledged partner, but again, I don't think the quote reflects poorly upon his emotional attachment to his wife.

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