What is Montag's job, and how does he feel about it?

Montag's job is a fireman, which means he burns books. As the novel progresses, Montag consciousness shifts so that he changes from loving his job to hating it. By the novel's end, Montag's has transformed from an enthusiastic book burner to a dedicated book preserver.

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Montag is a fireman, but not the kind of fireman we would think of automatically today. In this futuristic world, in which reading is against the law, Guy Montag's job is to burn books. At first he is fairly ambivalent about this, but after having a conversation with his new...

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Montag is a fireman, but not the kind of fireman we would think of automatically today. In this futuristic world, in which reading is against the law, Guy Montag's job is to burn books. At first he is fairly ambivalent about this, but after having a conversation with his new neighbor, seventeen-year-old Clarisse McLellan, his mind starts to change.

Most people have accepted the status quo in this rigid, structured, dystopic society, but Clarisse is not one of those people. She asks Montag if it's true that in different times, firemen used to put fires out, rather than being the ones to start them.

Clarisse then throws Montag further off kilter by asking him if he's happy. This makes him start to think, because he has never thought about this. No one has ever asked him such a question.

His curiosity about life and the way things are continues to grow, and he winds up stealing a bible that he is meant to be burning. His disillusionment with his job grows and grows. Eventually, Montag conspires with a former professor named Faber, and the two formulate a plot to overthrow the firemen.

Unfortunately, Montag's wife alerts the authorities to what they are up to. His protest against his former job leads him to burn down his house and murder his boss.

By the end of the novel, Montag has joined a group of vagabonds who are memorizing books so that even if they are destroyed, they can never be lost.

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Montag is a fireman. In his dystopic world, this means he burns books. This is a high-status job and when the novel opens he is proud to have it.

Books are banned in his society, and those people hiding books have their homes burned out. In the beginning of the novel, Montag gets a thrill from the excitement of incinerating the illegal volumes.

But as he meets and talks with Clarisse, he begins to realize he is not very happy. This is a "drip" that begins to put out the pleasure of his fire-based job. Another drip is Mildred's attempted suicide. He begins to realize that being a fireman is not all that thrilling after all. Instead, he becomes interested in books and reading.

As Montag's consciousness shifts, he begins to dislike his job more and more. He gets to a point where he doesn't want to go to work. He begins to collect books and tries to get Mildred to join him in reading. He connects with former professor Faber, and the two plot to undermine the firemen's book burning work.

The novel shows Montag shifting from gung-ho book burning enthusiast and supporter of dystopic social norms to someone who increasingly questions the system. As he does so, he moves from book burner to book preserver.

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Once upon a time (in our society), firemen used to put out fires. But in the dystopian nightmare world Guy Montag inhabits, a fireman's job is to set fires—to set fires on which books are thrown, to be precise. Books are considered dangerous in this conformist, mass-consumerist society; they do crazy things like encourage people to think. So, onto the fire they go.

At first, Montag is incredibly proud of the part he plays in these wanton acts of bibiliophobic destruction. He cheerfully goes along with burning books without a moment's thought, just as a loyal servant of the regime should. It's only after meeting a highly unusual woman by the name of Clarisse—unusual in that she is a staunch non-conformist with ideas of her own—that Montag begins to see the light among the heat, as it were. From then on, he gradually morphs into a rebel, determined to overthrow the evil regime to which he's given such loyal, faithful service over many years.

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The opening line of Fahrenheit 451 describes Montag's feelings about his job:

"It was a pleasure to burn. It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened, and changed" (3).

Initially, Montag is proud to be a fireman. He upholds the law by burning the houses of those who own books, and, of course, he burns the books as well.

When he meets a teenaged girl named Clarisse, he tells her that kerosene "is nothing but perfume to me" (6). This shows that Montag not only likes his job, but he fancies it to the point of loving the smell of the thing that helps to start the fires. When the girl presses him further to discuss his job, Montag proudly says that "It's fine work" (8). All he really has to do is show up to people's houses, burn books, then the house, and return to the fire station. Usually, the police arrest the owners of the home before the firemen arrive, so Montag doesn't see that he is hurting people in his line of work. It's just fun to burn things down, and he's been doing it for ten years.

After meeting Clarisse, who challenges his current state of mind about life and his job, he also sees a woman burn herself for her books. Apparently, the police didn't get to the old woman and arrest her before the firemen arrive at the scene. Montag is so mentally disturbed to witness the old woman's suicide that he goes home and throws up. Based on his experiences with Clarisse and the old woman, Montag changes and doesn't see his job as so noble anymore, and that is where the rest of the story begins.

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Montag's job in Fahrenheit 451 is that of a fireman. He is charged with the task of burning books. This act is done in the hopes of calming the masses by eliminating material that may drive them to express themselves in a negative manner. At the beginning of the novel, Montag does not mind his job; he just does what he is told without question.

Then after meeting a young woman named Clarisse, he begins to change. She questions his role as firefighter which causes him to question what he does for a living. Montag soon realizes that everyone is dulled into a false sense of happiness. This is achieved through the removal of the things which could stimulate people mentally and so forth, namely the books he is burning at work.

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