What is Keats saying about the Nile River in the final four lines of "To the Nile"?

In "To the Nile," John Keats focuses his final four lines on describing the Nile as being like all other rivers in its natural characteristics. It has the same rushes and isles as other rivers. It reflects the sun, and it flows to the sea.

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In the last four lines of "To the Nile," the speaker compares the Nile to other rivers. It may have deep roots in mythology, a foreign mystique, and a reputation for special fertility, but in the end, the Nile is simply a river, just like all the rest.

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In the last four lines of "To the Nile," the speaker compares the Nile to other rivers. It may have deep roots in mythology, a foreign mystique, and a reputation for special fertility, but in the end, the Nile is simply a river, just like all the rest.

The Nile, the speaker remarks, bedews "Green rushes." In other words, the plant life that surrounds it and is in it is not at all unusual. Rushes grow in all rivers, taking their nourishment from the water. The Nile is no different. The "pleasant sunrise" shines over the Nile, just like it does everywhere else. The Nile tastes the sunrise as it reflects the colors of the sky.

Further, the Nile has its share of "Green isles," those little fresh places in the midst of the stream that all rivers have and that provide a delightful contrast to the rushing waters. Finally, just like all rivers, the Nile flows "happily" to the sea.

The Nile, then, is just like every other river in the world in many ways. It does not carry anything particularly special in its nature. It is simply part of of the landscape. People have imbued it with a character, a glamor, and a reputation that it does not carry in itself.

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