Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

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What is Jane Austen saying about her views of gossip in Sense and Sensibility? What do the several instances of gossip throughout her novel reveal about her thoughts on gossip? Gossip is a huge pattern...

What is Jane Austen saying about her views of gossip in Sense and Sensibility? What do the several instances of gossip throughout her novel reveal about her thoughts on gossip? Gossip is a huge pattern throughout this book; what are some examples where gossip goes against its norms? Is gossip always bad? What is Austen trying to tell us?

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Through the lens of Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, one may conclude that Austen’s view on gossip is poor when considering how several characters suffer from the consequences of gossip. From the very beginning, Jane Austen provides us with a strong example of this in the gossip of the narrow-minded and selfish Fanny Dashwood.

Mr. John Dashwood, the half-brother of the novel’s two heroines, originally intended to gift his stepmother and sisters with three thousand pounds in honor of his late father. His wife, however, speculates over the true meaning of his father’s last wishes and reasons that surely three women...

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