What is Hamlet's relationship towards Horatio, Ophelia and his mother?

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Horatio is Hamlet's best friend and the only person he trusts in Denmark. Hamlet informs Horatio about Claudius 's role in his father's assassination, discusses with Horatio how he escaped imminent death while sailing to England, and also entrusts Horatio to tell his tragic story. Hamlet's private conversations with...

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Horatio is Hamlet's best friend and the only person he trusts in Denmark. Hamlet informs Horatio about Claudius's role in his father's assassination, discusses with Horatio how he escaped imminent death while sailing to England, and also entrusts Horatio to tell his tragic story. Hamlet's private conversations with Horatio also provide further insight into Hamlet's emotions, and their relationship provides commentary on Hamlet's eventual death and legacy.

Hamlet is romantically involved with Ophelia but uses her as a pawn to outwit and confuse Claudius and his agents. Hamlet's feelings towards Ophelia are ambiguous and contradictory. At times, Hamlet completely dismisses Ophelia and denies being remotely interested in her. Hamlet then shows affection by flirting with Ophelia during the play and reveals his love for her by jumping into her grave—where he wrestles Laertes. Hamlet's treatment of Ophelia may indicate that he does not believe her feelings for him are genuine and that she is simply another one of Claudius's agents.

Hamlet resents his mother Gertrude for immediately marrying Claudius following her husband's death. Hamlet is disgusted and appalled by Gertrude's decision to marry his uncle and criticizes her incestuous relationship. Hamlet is hurt by Gertrude's actions and cannot believe that she has stooped so low as to marry Claudius. He confronts Gertrude in her private chamber in act 3, scene 4, and ends up killing Polonius—who is spying on Hamlet behind an arras. Hamlet was evidently close with his mother before she married Claudius, which explains his strong emotions regarding her marriage.

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Hamlet trusts Horatio above all the other characters in the play. Horatio is Hamlet's best friend, and the one that Hamlet relies on to help him see the reality of the situation with his father.

Hamlet's relationship with Ophelia is often debated, as to whether or not he truly loved her and why he treats her the way he does. The play seems to best support the idea that Hamlet did truly love Ophelia, but is disillisioned about love and loyalty through the marriage of his mother to Claudius. It seems that Hamlet doubts the sincerity of Ophelia's love for him, especially when she returns his letters.

As for Hamlet and Gertrude, Hamlet is deeply resentful of his mother's quick marriage. It is very clear that he is close to his mother, and that he esteemed his father above everyone else. While he knows that she was not immediately involved in the murder of his father, Hamlet equates remarrying with murder in Act 3 with the players. He judges her because of her fickleness, and this makes him suspicious of the integrity of others in the play.

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